Catalogo Articoli (Spogli Riviste)

OPAC HELP

Titolo:
EFFECTS OF BODY CORE TEMPERATURE AND BRAIN DOPAMINE ACTIVITY ON TIMING PROCESSES IN HUMANS
Autore:
RAMMSAYER TH;
Indirizzi:
UNIV JENA,INST PSYCHOL,HUMBOLDT STR 11 D-07743 JENA GERMANY
Titolo Testata:
Biological psychology
fascicolo: 2, volume: 46, anno: 1997,
pagine: 169 - 192
SICI:
0301-0511(1997)46:2<169:EOBCTA>2.0.ZU;2-5
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
NEUROLEPTIC MALIGNANT SYNDROME; UNDERLYING TIME PERCEPTION; INTERNAL CLOCK; DURATION DISCRIMINATION; HUMAN-PERFORMANCE; PREFRONTAL CORTEX; D-AMPHETAMINE; PHARMACO-EEG; HALOPERIDOL; THERMOREGULATION;
Keywords:
TEMPORAL INFORMATION PROCESSING; DOPAMINE; BODY TEMPERATURE;
Tipo documento:
Review
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Physical, Chemical & Earth Sciences
Physical, Chemical & Earth Sciences
Science Citation Index Expanded
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
107
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
T.H. Rammsayer, "EFFECTS OF BODY CORE TEMPERATURE AND BRAIN DOPAMINE ACTIVITY ON TIMING PROCESSES IN HUMANS", Biological psychology, 46(2), 1997, pp. 169-192

Abstract

In a placebo-controlled study, the effects of experimentally induced increase in body core temperature and of the dopamine antagonist haloperidol on judgments of an apparent second, a speeded-tapping task, andtemporal discrimination of intervals in the range of milliseconds andseconds were investigated in 40 healthy male subjects. A 0.7 degrees C-increase in body core temperature due to 3-h exposure to an ambient temperature of 52 degrees C did not cause any statistically significant changes in timing tasks. Unlike heat exposure, 3 mg of haloperidol caused a pronounced impairment of performance on the temporal discrimination of intervals in the range of milliseconds and seconds (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001, respectively) as well as speeded tapping (P < 0.05). For temporal discrimination of intervals in the range of seconds, a significant interaction between ambient temperature and haloperidol could be established (P < 0.05) indicating that haloperidol caused a significant performance decrement only in subjects exposed to an ambient temperature of 28 degrees C but not in those exposed to 52 degrees C. The overall pattern of results suggests that temporal processing of intervals in the range of milliseconds can be considered a function of dopaminergic activity in the basal ganglia while temporal processing of longer intervals appears to be cognitively mediated. Furthermore, the hypothesis that timing processes in humans are modulated by changes in body core temperature could not be established. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 08/04/20 alle ore 09:06:35