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Titolo:
TRANS-FATTY-ACIDS - INFANT AND FETAL DEVELOPMENT
Autore:
CARLSON SE; CLANDININ MT; COOK HW; EMKEN EA; FILER LJ;
Indirizzi:
INT LIFE SCI INST,1126 16TH ST NW WASHINGTON DC 20036
Titolo Testata:
The American journal of clinical nutrition
fascicolo: 3, volume: 66, anno: 1997,
pagine: 717 - 736
SICI:
0002-9165(1997)66:3<717:T-IAFD>2.0.ZU;2-0
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
RAT-LIVER MICROSOMES; VISUAL-ACUITY DEVELOPMENT; HUMAN-SKIN FIBROBLASTS; CULTURED GLIOMA-CELLS; HUMAN-TISSUE LIPIDS; UNITED-STATES DIET; MATURE HUMAN-MILK; ARACHIDONIC-ACID; ADIPOSE-TISSUE; LINOLEIC-ACID;
Keywords:
TRANS FATTY ACIDS; EARLY DEVELOPMENT; INFANT; FETUS; LIPIDS; GROWTH; METABOLISM;
Tipo documento:
Review
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
210
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
S.E. Carlson et al., "TRANS-FATTY-ACIDS - INFANT AND FETAL DEVELOPMENT", The American journal of clinical nutrition, 66(3), 1997, pp. 717-736

Abstract

This review evaluates scientific data associated with the possibilitythat trans fatty acids compromise fetal and infant early development. Concerns have been triggered by research that has heightened our awareness of the importance of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids; shown that trans fatty acids inhibit Delta 6 desaturation of linoleic acid; identified trans fatty acid isomers in fetal, infant, and maternal tissues; and reported an inverse association between the trans fatty acid content of tissue lipids and measures of growth and development. Animal studies provide little evidence that trans fatty acids influence growth, reproduction, or gross aspects of fetal development. However, these models may not have been appropriate for addressing all the subtle effects that influence development of human infant retinal, neural, or brain function. Human studies are hampered by the complexity of the interrelations among nutritional, genetic, and environmental factors and by ethical considerations that constrain the research design. Existing data have not established a causal relation between trans fatty acid intake and early development. Conclusions cannot be drawn from the possible association found between trans fatty acid exposure and lower n-3 and n-6long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and growth because of confounding factors. Few studies addressed the question of whether trans fattyacids adversely affect human fetal growth. One study reported a correlation between the trans fatty acid content of plasma and birth weightof preterm infants and one study reported a relation between preterm births and the trans fatty acid content of maternal plasma. Limited associative data have addressed whether trans fatty acids adversely affect fetal and infant neurodevelopment and growth. The interpretation ofexisting research and development of recommendations should be done cautiously. Suggestions for research to clarify these issues are made.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 03/07/20 alle ore 01:28:36