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Titolo:
SOCIAL SUPPORT, STRESS, AND BLOOD-PRESSURE IN BLACK ADULTS
Autore:
STROGATZ DS; CROFT JB; JAMES SA; KEENAN NL; BROWNING SR; GARRETT JM; CURTIS AB;
Indirizzi:
SUNY ALBANY,SCH PUBL HLTH,DEPT EPIDEMIOL,1 UNIV PL RENSSELAER NY 12144 NEW YORK STATE DEPT HLTH,SCH PUBL HLTH,DEPT EPIDEMIOL ALBANY NY 00000 UNIV N CAROLINA,SCH PUBL HLTH,DEPT EPIDEMIOL CHAPEL HILL NC 00000 UNIV MICHIGAN,DEPT EPIDEMIOL,SCH PUBL HLTH ANN ARBOR MI 48109 UNIV MICHIGAN,SURVEY RES CTR,INST SURVEY RES ANN ARBOR MI 48109 UNIV N CAROLINA,HLTH SERV RES CTR CHAPEL HILL NC 00000
Titolo Testata:
Epidemiology
fascicolo: 5, volume: 8, anno: 1997,
pagine: 482 - 487
SICI:
1044-3983(1997)8:5<482:SSSABI>2.0.ZU;2-A
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
NUTRITION EXAMINATION SURVEY; JOHN-HENRYISM; SOCIOECONOMIC-STATUS; NATIONAL-HEALTH; UNITED-STATES; RISK-FACTORS; PITT COUNTY; LIFE-STYLE; HYPERTENSION; WHITES;
Keywords:
BLACKS; BLOOD PRESSURE; HYPERTENSION; SOCIAL SUPPORT; SOCIOECONOMIC FACTORS; STRESS; GENDER;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
46
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
D.S. Strogatz et al., "SOCIAL SUPPORT, STRESS, AND BLOOD-PRESSURE IN BLACK ADULTS", Epidemiology, 8(5), 1997, pp. 482-487

Abstract

Psychosocial factors arising from socioeconomic disadvantage and discrimination may contribute to the excess risk of elevated blood pressure in African-Americans. The purpose of this study was to assess the association of social support and stress with blood pressure in a community-based sample of 25- to 50-year old black adults in Pitt County, NC. A stratified random sample of dwellings was selected in 1988, and 1,784 black adults (80% of those eligible) were interviewed. Analyses were sex specific and adjusted for age, obesity, and waist/hip ratio. Inseparate analyses of emotional support, instrumental support, and stress with blood pressure, all associations were in the predicted direction (inverse for support, direct for stress) but were stronger for systolic than for diastolic brood pressure. Differences in systolic bloodpressure associated with low support or high stress ranged from 5.2 to 3.6 mmHg in women and 3.5 to 2.5 mmHg in men. In simultaneous regression analyses of support and stress, each of the separate effects was reduced for women, but a sizable aggregate effect of low support and high stress remained [+7.2 mmHg (95% confidence limits = +1.3, +13.1) for systolic blood pressure and +4.0 mmHg (95% confidence limits = +0.1, +7.9) for diastolic blood pressure].

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 09/07/20 alle ore 00:34:22