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Titolo:
Clonality in the myelodysplastic syndromes
Autore:
Boultwood, J; Wainscoat, JS;
Indirizzi:
John Radcliffe Hosp, Nuffield Dept Clin Lab Sci, Leukaemia Res Fund Mol Haematol Unit, Oxford OX3 9DU, England John Radcliffe Hosp Oxford England OX3 9DU Unit, Oxford OX3 9DU, England
Titolo Testata:
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HEMATOLOGY
fascicolo: 4, volume: 73, anno: 2001,
pagine: 411 - 415
SICI:
0925-5710(200106)73:4<411:CITMS>2.0.ZU;2-6
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
IN-SITU HYBRIDIZATION; FRAGMENT-LENGTH-POLYMORPHISMS; CHRONIC MYELOMONOCYTIC LEUKEMIA; ACUTE MYELOID-LEUKEMIA; NATURAL-KILLER-CELLS; LINEAGE INVOLVEMENT; BONE-MARROW; B-CELLS; INSITU HYBRIDIZATION; GENE REARRANGEMENTS;
Keywords:
myelodysplastic syndromes; multipotent hematopoietic stem cell; clonality; X-chromosome inactivation patterns; fluorescence in situ hybridization;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Citazioni:
49
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Boultwood, J John Radcliffe Hosp, Nuffield Dept Clin Lab Sci, Leukaemia Res Fund Mol Haematol Unit, Oxford OX3 9DU, England John Radcliffe Hosp Oxford England OX3 9DU OX3 9DU, England
Citazione:
J. Boultwood e J.S. Wainscoat, "Clonality in the myelodysplastic syndromes", INT J HEMAT, 73(4), 2001, pp. 411-415

Abstract

The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) comprise a heterogeneous group of stem cell disorders involving cytopenia and dysplastic changes in 3 hematopoietic lineages. Although it is accepted that MDS is a clonal disorder, the exact nature of the involvement of multipotent stem cells and progenitor cells has not been resolved. Most clonality studies of MDS support the proposalthat the primary neoplastic event occurs, in most patients, at the level of a committed myeloid progenitor cell, capable of differentiation into multiple myeloid lineages. The extent of the involvement of T and B lymphocytesin MDS remains controversial. Much of the variation reported may result from disease heterogeneity and technical issues such as skewed methylation patterns occurring in studies analyzing X-chromosome inactivation patterns (XCIP) and possible impurities in lymphocyte preparation. A great deal of theevidence in support of T-lymphocyte involvement in MDS has been generated by XCIP studies, and some of these data need to be treated with caution, especially data from studies in which appropriate controls were omitted. In contrast, B-lymphocyte involvement in some patients with MDS is based on studies using more robust technology including combined immunophenotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Clonality studies involving myeloid andlymphoid cells in MDS have yielded discrepant results with regard to the potential involvement of multipotent (lympho-myeloid) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). However, failure to detect a clonal marker in all cells of all lineages does not preclude multipotent-HSC involvement. Some recent studies have produced compelling evidence to show that, in some patients with MDS, the multipotent HSC is the target of the primary neoplastic event. It now seems probable that MDS arises in multipotent HSCs more commonly than previously recognized. Such data not only provide important new insights into thebiology of MDS but also may have therapeutic implications. The determination of whether multipotent HSCs are involved in the MDS clone may be important for the use of autologous stem cell transplantation in these patients. Int J Hematol. 2001,73:411-415. (C) 2001 The Japanese Society of Hematology.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 05/12/20 alle ore 00:57:48