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Titolo:
Experimental evidence that plants under caterpillar attack may benefit from attracting parasitoids
Autore:
Hoballah, MEF; Turlings, TCJ;
Indirizzi:
Univ Neuchatel, Inst Zool, Lab Ecol Anim & Entomol, CH-2007 Neuchatel, Switzerland Univ Neuchatel Neuchatel Switzerland CH-2007 2007 Neuchatel, Switzerland
Titolo Testata:
EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY RESEARCH
fascicolo: 5, volume: 3, anno: 2001,
pagine: 553 - 565
SICI:
1522-0613(200107)3:5<553:EETPUC>2.0.ZU;2-B
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
APANTELES-MARGINIVENTRIS HYMENOPTERA; WOUND-INDUCED CHANGES; INDUCED RESPONSES; SPODOPTERA-FRUGIPERDA; CAMPOLETIS-SONORENSIS; FOOD-CONSUMPTION; FIELD CONDITIONS; NATURAL ENEMIES; FALL ARMYWORM; HOST LOCATION;
Keywords:
Campoletis sonorensis; Cotesia marginiventris; indirect defence; parasitoids; plant fitness; plant-insect interactions; Spodoptera littoralis; Zea mays;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Agriculture,Biology & Environmental Sciences
Citazioni:
57
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Turlings, TCJ Univ Neuchatel, Inst Zool, Lab Ecol Anim & Entomol, Case Postale 2, CH-2007 Neuchatel, Switzerland Univ Neuchatel Case Postale 2 Neuchatel Switzerland CH-2007
Citazione:
M.E.F. Hoballah e T.C.J. Turlings, "Experimental evidence that plants under caterpillar attack may benefit from attracting parasitoids", EVOL EC RES, 3(5), 2001, pp. 553-565

Abstract

Herbivore-induced plant volatiles have been suggested to function as indirect defence signals that attract natural enemies of herbivores. Several insect parasitoids are known to exploit such plant-provided cues to locate hosts. It is unclear if individual plants benefit from the action of parasitoids. We investigated this question in maize plants under attack by Spodoptera littoralis larvae and found that parasitization by the endoparasitoids Cotesia marginiventris and Campoletis sonorensis significantly reduced feeding and weight gain in the host larvae. As a result, young maize plants attacked by a single parasitized larva suffered much less feeding damage and, atmaturity, produced about 30% more seed than plants that were attacked by an unparasitized larva. Such fitness benefits may have contributed to selection pressures that shaped the evolution of herbivore-induced indirect defence signals in plants.

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Documento generato il 03/04/20 alle ore 14:08:01