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Titolo:
Metabolic costs incurred by crayfish (Procambarus acutus) in a trace element-polluted habitat: further evidence of similar responses among diverse taxonomic groups
Autore:
Rowe, CL; Hopkins, WA; Zehnder, C; Congdon, JD;
Indirizzi:
Univ Maryland, Chesapeake Biol Lab, Ctr Environm Sci, Solomons, MD 20688 USA Univ Maryland Solomons MD USA 20688 Environm Sci, Solomons, MD 20688 USA Univ Georgia, Savannah River Ecol Lab, Aiken, SC 29802 USA Univ Georgia Aiken SC USA 29802 annah River Ecol Lab, Aiken, SC 29802 USA
Titolo Testata:
COMPARATIVE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY C-TOXICOLOGY & PHARMACOLOGY
fascicolo: 3, volume: 129, anno: 2001,
pagine: 275 - 283
SICI:
1532-0456(200107)129:3<275:MCIBC(>2.0.ZU;2-J
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
COAL COMBUSTION WASTE; BULLFROGS RANA-CATESBEIANA; PHYSIOLOGICAL ENERGETICS; PROTEIN-TURNOVER; ORAL DEFORMITIES; BUFO-TERRESTRIS; SOUTHERN TOADS; STRESS; GROWTH; MOLLUSKS;
Keywords:
coal ash; contaminants; energy budget; growth; heavy metals; metabolic rate; respiration; sublethal stress; trace elements;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
32
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Rowe, CL Univ Maryland, Chesapeake Biol Lab, Ctr Environm Sci, POB 38, Solomons, MD20688 USA Univ Maryland POB 38 Solomons MD USA 20688 Solomons, MD20688 USA
Citazione:
C.L. Rowe et al., "Metabolic costs incurred by crayfish (Procambarus acutus) in a trace element-polluted habitat: further evidence of similar responses among diverse taxonomic groups", COMP BIOC C, 129(3), 2001, pp. 275-283

Abstract

Recent studies of several vertebrates and an invertebrate have shown elevated standard metabolic rate (SMR) following chronic exposure to a mixture of trace elements in a contaminated habitat. In this study, we examined whether another invertebrate, a crayfish (Procambarus acutus), also experiencedelevated SMR in response to the same contaminants. We compared SMR of individuals inhabiting the contaminated site with SMR of individuals from uncontaminated reference sites. We also examined SMR of individuals collected from the reference areas and exposed in the laboratory for 50 days to sediment and food derived from the contaminated site. Individuals collected from the contaminated site had elevated SMR compared to individuals collected from the unpolluted areas (25.1 vs. 19.2 J g(-1) day(-1)). Individuals exposedto contaminated sediment and food in the laboratory experienced elevationsin SMR compared to controls after 27 days of exposure (35.2 vs. 29.4 J g(-1) day(-1)), but after 50 days of exposure, metabolic rate no longer differed between treatments. Growth of contaminant-exposed individuals was lower than growth of reference animals throughout the laboratory study. Elevated SMR associated with contaminant exposure may reflect energy demanding mechanisms required to combat deleterious effects of contaminants. Our results support the prediction that increases in energy expenditure in the contaminated habitat would negatively influence production processes, such as growth. Results from this study in conjunction with observations from other species suggest that increased SMR is a common response among several taxa to the mixture of contaminants in the study site. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 20/09/20 alle ore 23:10:48