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Titolo:
Parasite infection and caloric restriction induce physiological and morphological plasticity
Autore:
Kristan, DM; Hammond, KA;
Indirizzi:
Univ Calif Riverside, Dept Biol, Riverside, CA 92507 USA Univ Calif Riverside Riverside CA USA 92507 Biol, Riverside, CA 92507 USA
Titolo Testata:
AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY-REGULATORY INTEGRATIVE AND COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY
fascicolo: 2, volume: 281, anno: 2001,
pagine: R502 - R510
SICI:
0363-6119(200108)281:2<R502:PIACRI>2.0.ZU;2-U
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
MOUSE SMALL-INTESTINE; HELIGMOSOMOIDES-POLYGYRUS; FOOD RESTRICTION; ENERGY RESTRICTION; METABOLIC-RATE; DEFICIENCY; MICE; HELMINTHIASIS; CARBOHYDRATE; REPRODUCTION;
Keywords:
intestinal parasites; Mus musculus; Heligmosomoides polygyrus;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
56
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Kristan, DM Univ Calif Riverside, Dept Biol, Riverside, CA 92507 USA Univ Calif Riverside Riverside CA USA 92507 ide, CA 92507 USA
Citazione:
D.M. Kristan e K.A. Hammond, "Parasite infection and caloric restriction induce physiological and morphological plasticity", AM J P-REG, 281(2), 2001, pp. R502-R510

Abstract

To investigate the effects of parasitism and caloric restriction on morphology (body composition, organ mass) and physiology (resting metabolism, intestinal glucose transport capacity), we gave laboratory mice intestinal parasites (Heligmosomoides polygyrus, Nematoda), 30% caloric restriction, or both. Calorically restricted mice had smaller body mass, enhanced glucose transport capacity, and lower resting metabolism than ad libitum-fed mice. Parasitized mice maintained body mass, had diminished intestinal glucose transport capacity, and greater resting metabolism than unparasitized mice. Parasitized, calorically restricted mice had smaller organ masses than parasitized, ad libitum-fed mice and did not increase their glucose uptake rate asmuch as unparasitized, calorically restricted mice. There was a significant interaction between caloric restriction and parasite status for morphological variables but not for physiological variables. Knowing the types of phenotypic changes that occur with simultaneous parasitism and caloric restriction will provide insight into understanding human helminthiasis in food-restricted communities and also how wild animals cope with environments where parasitism and seasonal food restriction are common.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 28/01/21 alle ore 08:05:54