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Titolo:
Feature and conjunction errors in recognition memory: Evidence for dual-process theory
Autore:
Jones, TC; Jacoby, LL;
Indirizzi:
Victoria Univ Wellington, Sch Psychol, Wellington, New Zealand Victoria Univ Wellington Wellington New Zealand Wellington, New Zealand NYU, New York, NY USA NYU New York NY USANYU, New York, NY USA Washington Univ, St Louis, MO 63130 USA Washington Univ St Louis MO USA 63130 ington Univ, St Louis, MO 63130 USA
Titolo Testata:
JOURNAL OF MEMORY AND LANGUAGE
fascicolo: 1, volume: 45, anno: 2001,
pagine: 82 - 102
SICI:
0749-596X(200107)45:1<82:FACEIR>2.0.ZU;2-8
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
ASSOCIATIVE INFORMATION; DIVIDED ATTENTION; RELATIONAL INFORMATION; UNCONSCIOUS INFLUENCES; ITEM RECOGNITION; PROCESS MODEL; OLDER ADULTS; TIME-COURSE; RETRIEVAL; FAMILIARITY;
Keywords:
recognition memory; false recognition; feature errors; conjunction errors; recollection; familiarity; dual-process theory;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Citazioni:
66
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Jones, TC Victoria Univ Wellington, Sch Psychol, POB 600, Wellington, New Zealand Victoria Univ Wellington POB 600 Wellington New Zealand ealand
Citazione:
T.C. Jones e L.L. Jacoby, "Feature and conjunction errors in recognition memory: Evidence for dual-process theory", J MEM LANG, 45(1), 2001, pp. 82-102

Abstract

Feature and conjunction errors in recognition memory were investigated using a dual-process framework. In Experiment 1, dividing attention at study or rest decreased old word recognition bur did not influence feature and conjunction recognition errors after correcting for false alarms to new words (baseline). In Experiment 2, a response deadline manipulation influenced old word recognition but not feature and conjunction effects (i.e., feature or conjunction error rate minus baseline). Across Experiments 3 and 4, studyrepetitions increased the probabilities of feature and conjunction errors for participants under strong pressure to respond quickly. However, no suchincreases were observed for participants who were given more time to respond, providing evidence that the Familiarity underlying feature and conjunction errors can be countered with recollection. Thus study repetition increased both familiarity and recollection. Feature and conjunction errors are based on familiarity in the absence of recollection. An approach that combines an item-associative distinction with a dual-process framework (e.g., Yonelinas, 1997) also can account for these errors. However. an approach that uses a feature-configuration distinction must be modified to account for these results. (C) 2001 Academic Press.

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Documento generato il 31/03/20 alle ore 15:56:48