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Titolo:
The glycinergic inhibitory synapse
Autore:
Legendre, P;
Indirizzi:
Univ Paris 06, Lab Neurobiol Processus Adoptasifs, F-75252 Paris 05, France Univ Paris 06 Paris France 05 essus Adoptasifs, F-75252 Paris 05, France
Titolo Testata:
CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR LIFE SCIENCES
fascicolo: 5-6, volume: 58, anno: 2001,
pagine: 760 - 793
SICI:
1420-682X(200105)58:5-6<760:TGIS>2.0.ZU;2-Q
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
PROTEIN-KINASE-C; RAT SPINAL-CORD; GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC-ACID; RECEPTOR-BETA-SUBUNIT; SINGLE-CHANNEL CURRENTS; SYMPATHETIC PREGANGLIONIC NEURONS; DORSAL COMMISSURAL NEURONS; SUBSTANTIA-NIGRA NEURONS; CENTRAL-NERVOUS-SYSTEM; GATED ION CHANNELS;
Keywords:
inhibitory synapse; glycine receptor; synaptogenesis; synaptic current; synaptic vesicular release; receptor-channel kinetics; postsynaptic receptor modulation; glycine uptake; glycine clearance;
Tipo documento:
Review
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
327
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Legendre, P Univ Paris 06, Lab Neurobiol Processus Adoptasifs, Bat B 6eme Etage,Boite 8,7 Quai St Bernard, F-75252 Paris 05, France Univ Paris 06 BatB 6eme Etage,Boite 8,7 Quai St Bernard Paris France 05
Citazione:
P. Legendre, "The glycinergic inhibitory synapse", CELL MOL L, 58(5-6), 2001, pp. 760-793

Abstract

Glycine is one of the most important inhibitory neurotransmitters in the spinal cord and the brainstem, and glycinergic synapses have a well-established role in the regulation of locomotor behavior. Research over the last 15years has yielded new insights on glycine neurotransmission. Glycinergic synapses are now known not to be restricted to the spinal cord and the brainstem. Presynaptic machinery for glycine release and uptake, the structure and function of postsynaptic receptors and the factors (both pre- and postsynaptic) which control the strength of glycinergic inhibition have been extensively studied. It is now established that glycinergic synapses can be excitatory in the immature brain and that some inhibitory synapses can corelease gamma -aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine. Moreover, the presence of glycine transporters on glial cells and the capacity of these cells to release glycine suggest that glycine may also act as a neuromodulator. Extensivemolecular studies have revealed the presence of distinct subtypes of postsynaptic glycine receptors with different functional properties. Mechanisms of glycine receptors aggregation at postsynaptic sites during development are better understood and functional implications of variation in receptor number between postsynaptic sites are partly elucidated. Mutations of glycine receptor subunits have been shown to underly some human locomotor disorders, including the startle disease. Clearly, recent work on glycine receptorchannels and the synapses at which they mediate inhibitory signalling in both young and adult animals necessitates an update of our vision of glycinergic inhibitory transmission.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 25/01/20 alle ore 18:27:44