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Titolo:
Is there a negative association between anxiety sensitivity and arousal-increasing substances and activities?
Autore:
McWilliams, LA; Asmundson, GJG;
Indirizzi:
Regina Hlth Dist, Clin Res & Dev Program, Regina, SK S4S 0A5, Canada Regina Hlth Dist Regina SK Canada S4S 0A5 ram, Regina, SK S4S 0A5, Canada Univ Regina, Regina, SK S4S 0A2, Canada Univ Regina Regina SK Canada S4S 0A2 v Regina, Regina, SK S4S 0A2, Canada
Titolo Testata:
JOURNAL OF ANXIETY DISORDERS
fascicolo: 3, volume: 15, anno: 2001,
pagine: 161 - 170
SICI:
0887-6185(200105/06)15:3<161:ITANAB>2.0.ZU;2-5
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
ALCOHOL-USE;
Keywords:
anxiety sensitivity; arousal; substance use; caffeine; nicotine; exercise;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Citazioni:
19
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Asmundson, GJG Regina Hlth Dist, Clin Res & Dev Program, 2180 23rd Ave, Regina, SK S4S 0A5, Canada Regina Hlth Dist 2180 23rd Ave Regina SK Canada S4S 0A5 ada
Citazione:
L.A. McWilliams e G.J.G. Asmundson, "Is there a negative association between anxiety sensitivity and arousal-increasing substances and activities?", J ANXIETY D, 15(3), 2001, pp. 161-170

Abstract

Little research has addressed McNally's hypothesis [(1996). Anxiety sensitivity is distinguishable from trait anxiety. In: R. M. Rapee (Ed.), Currentcontroversies in the anxiety disorders (pp, 214-227). New York: The Guilford Press.] that anxiety sensitivity (AS) should be negatively associated with the use of arousal-increasing substances. In the present study, we examined the relationship between AS and the self-reported use of two widely available stimulants - nicotine and caffeine - and exercise frequency in a sample of 256 university students. A measure of trait anxiety was also incorporated within the design. The associations between use of both substances and levels of AS and trait anxiety were weak and nonsignificant. Although inconsistent with McNally's hypothesis, some significant findings were found when the lower-order components of AS (i.e., fears of physical, psychological, and publicly observable symptoms of anxiety) were examined. The associations between exercise frequency and the anxiety measures, indicating a negative relationship, were generally consistent with McNally's hypothesis. Implications of these findings are discussed with reference to future investigation. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 14/07/20 alle ore 12:31:19