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Titolo:
Human face recognition in sheep: lack of configurational coding and right hemisphere advantage
Autore:
Peirce, JW; Leigh, AE; daCosta, APC; Kendrick, KM;
Indirizzi:
Babraham Inst, Lab Cognit & Dev Neurosci, Cambridge CB2 4AT, England Babraham Inst Cambridge England CB2 4AT osci, Cambridge CB2 4AT, England
Titolo Testata:
BEHAVIOURAL PROCESSES
fascicolo: 1, volume: 55, anno: 2001,
pagine: 13 - 26
SICI:
0376-6357(20010613)55:1<13:HFRISL>2.0.ZU;2-6
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
HUMAN FUSIFORM GYRUS; EXTERNAL FEATURES; UNFAMILIAR FACES; CHIMERIC FACES; DISCRIMINATION; PERCEPTION; EXPERTISE; SPECIALIZATION; ASYMMETRIES; FAMILIARITY;
Keywords:
asymmetry; hemispheric lateralisation; chimeric; face processing; expertise; inversion;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Agriculture,Biology & Environmental Sciences
Citazioni:
31
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Kendrick, KM Babraham Inst, Lab Cognit & Dev Neurosci, Cambridge CB2 4AT, England Babraham Inst Cambridge England CB2 4AT ge CB2 4AT, England
Citazione:
J.W. Peirce et al., "Human face recognition in sheep: lack of configurational coding and right hemisphere advantage", BEHAV PROC, 55(1), 2001, pp. 13-26

Abstract

Face recognition in sheep is qualitatively similar to that in humans in terms of its left visual field bias, and the effects of expertise and configural coding. The current study was designed to determine whether such effects are species specific by investigating the case of sheep recognising humans. It was found that the sheep could identify human faces and while they showed a small inversion-induced decline in discriminatory performance, this was significantly less than seen with sheep faces. In other aspects, there were qualitative differences with human face recognition compared with conspecific recognition. In contrast with sheep faces there was no left visual field advantage in the recognition of human faces and the internal featureswere not used at all as visual cues. The data suggest that these sheep, whilst being extensively exposed to interactions with humans, were unable to identify them with all the same 'expert' methods as were used to discriminate other sheep. This suggests that different neural systems may, to some extent, be used for recognition of sheep as opposed to human faces. The relative contribution to differential neural processing of the faces of the different species and the role of expertise are discussed. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 19/01/20 alle ore 20:57:56