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Titolo:
The disconnect: Infertility patients' information and the role they wish to play in decision making
Autore:
Stewart, DE; Rosen, B; Irvine, J; Ritvo, P; Shapiro, H; Murphy, J; Thomas, J; Robinson, GE; Neuman, J; Deber, R;
Titolo Testata:
MEDSCAPE WOMENS HEALTH
fascicolo: 4, volume: 6, anno: 2001,
pagine: NIL_4 - NIL_11
SICI:
1521-2076(200107/08)6:4<NIL_4:TDIPIA>2.0.ZU;2-T
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
IN-VITRO FERTILIZATION; OVARIAN-CANCER RISK; STATES CASE-CONTROL; FERTILITY DRUGS; COLLABORATIVE ANALYSIS; BORDERLINE MALIGNANCY; WHITE WOMEN; TUMORS; COHORT;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Citazioni:
27
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
D.E. Stewart et al., "The disconnect: Infertility patients' information and the role they wish to play in decision making", MEDSC W H, 6(4), 2001, pp. NIL_4-NIL_11

Abstract

Objective: To determine the preferred role in medical decision making of women undergoing fertility treatments and to establish whether their knowledge of treatments is adequate to inform their choices. Methods: Self-report survey of 404 women undergoing fertility treatments in 2 university hospitals and a private fertility clinic in Canada. Results: The women had been in fertility treatment for 2.3 +/- 2.6 years; 67.8% reported taking fertility drugs. Most (61.7%) women wanted to share knowledge equally with their doctors about possible fertility treatments. However, about half wanted to decide alone or mostly by themselves about the acceptability of treatment risks and benefits (56%), what treatments shouldbe selected (49.8%), and when to conclude treatments (54.3%). In addition,55.1% of the women did not know their personal eventual chances of pregnancy with fertility treatment or thought it was 50% or greater. Over half of the women (57.2%) who had taken fertility drugs were unaware of a possible link between fertility drugs and increased ovarian cancer risk. The majority of women (61.8%) who knew of this possible association reported that theylearned about it from the print media. Women who knew of the association had a poor understanding of the strength of the evidence or the ability to detect or treat ovarian cancer successfully, and 88.3% thought they could reduce cancer risk by following their doctors' advice. Conclusions: Despite these women's wishes to actively participate in fertility treatment decisions, they lacked the necessary information to do so meaningfully. Public health policymakers, professional and advocacy organizations, physicians, other healthcare providers, and women themselves must find ways to improve the general public's and patients' understanding about fertility treatment outcomes and risks.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 10/07/20 alle ore 15:59:28