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Titolo:
Consensus and cohesion in simulated social networks
Autore:
Stocker, R; Green, DG; Newth, D;
Indirizzi:
Charles Sturt Univ, Johnstone Ctr, Albury, NSW, Australia Charles Sturt Univ Albury NSW Australia tone Ctr, Albury, NSW, Australia Charles Sturt Univ, Sch Environm & Informat Sci, Albury, NSW, Australia Charles Sturt Univ Albury NSW Australia rmat Sci, Albury, NSW, Australia
Titolo Testata:
JASSS-THE JOURNAL OF ARTIFICIAL SOCIETIES AND SOCIAL SIMULATION
fascicolo: 4, volume: 4, anno: 2001,
pagine: NIL_109 - NIL_125
SICI:
1460-7425(200110)4:4<NIL_109:CACISS>2.0.ZU;2-U
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
MODEL;
Keywords:
artificial societies; cohesion; communication; complexity; connectivity; influence; simulation; social networks;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Citazioni:
44
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Stocker, R Charles Sturt Univ, Johnstone Ctr, Albury, NSW, Australia Charles Sturt Univ Albury NSW Australia lbury, NSW, Australia
Citazione:
R. Stocker et al., "Consensus and cohesion in simulated social networks", JASSS, 4(4), 2001, pp. NIL_109-NIL_125

Abstract

Social structure emerges from the interaction and information exchange between individuals in a population. The emergence of groups in animal and human social systems suggests that such social structures are the result of a cooperative and cohesive society. Using graph based models, where nodes represent individuals in a population and edges represent communication pathways, we simulate individual influence and the communication of ideas in a population. Simulations of Dunbar's hypothesis (that natural group size in apes and humans arises from the transition from grooming behaviour to language or gossip) indicate that transmission rate and neighbourhood size accompany critical transitions of the order proposed in Dunbar's work. We demonstrate that critical levels of connectivity are required to achieve consensus in models that simulate individual influence.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 29/01/20 alle ore 19:04:02