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Titolo:
New views on old memories: re-evaluating the role of the hippocampal complex
Autore:
Rosenbaum, RS; Winocur, G; Moscovitch, M;
Indirizzi:
Univ Toronto, Dept Psychol, Toronto, ON M5S 1A1, Canada Univ Toronto Toronto ON Canada M5S 1A1 ychol, Toronto, ON M5S 1A1, Canada Trent Univ, Otonabee Coll, Dept Psychol, Peterborough, ON K9J 7B8, Canada Trent Univ Peterborough ON Canada K9J 7B8 eterborough, ON K9J 7B8, Canada Baycrest Ctr Geriatr Care, Rotman Res Inst, Toronto, ON L6A 2E1, Canada Baycrest Ctr Geriatr Care Toronto ON Canada L6A 2E1 o, ON L6A 2E1, Canada Baycrest Ctr Geriatr Care, Dept Psychol, Toronto, ON L6A 2E1, Canada Baycrest Ctr Geriatr Care Toronto ON Canada L6A 2E1 o, ON L6A 2E1, Canada
Titolo Testata:
BEHAVIOURAL BRAIN RESEARCH
fascicolo: 1-2, volume: 127, anno: 2001,
pagine: 183 - 197
SICI:
0166-4328(200112)127:1-2<183:NVOOMR>2.0.ZU;2-4
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
LONG-TERM-MEMORY; RETROGRADE-AMNESIA; EPISODIC MEMORY; AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL MEMORY; ANTEROGRADE AMNESIA; DORSAL HIPPOCAMPAL; SEMANTIC MEMORY; REMOTE MEMORY; RATS; LESIONS;
Keywords:
hippocampus; retrograde amnesia; consolidation; multiple trace theory; spatial memory; episodic memory; semantic memory; content-dependent memory; context-free memory;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
100
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Rosenbaum, RS Univ Toronto, Dept Psychol, 100 St George St, Toronto, ON M5S 1A1, Canada Univ Toronto 100 St George St Toronto ON Canada M5S 1A1 nada
Citazione:
R.S. Rosenbaum et al., "New views on old memories: re-evaluating the role of the hippocampal complex", BEH BRA RES, 127(1-2), 2001, pp. 183-197

Abstract

Evidence of temporally graded retrograde amnesia (RA) following hippocampal damage has fuelled the long-standing belief that memory undergoes a consolidation process, whereby memories are progressively modified in neocortical regions until they are independent of the hippocampal (HPC) complex. Support for this position derives from both the animal and human RA literature,although the results are not consistent, Specifically, consolidation theory does not account for loss of episodic (detail) information in humans and context-dependent information in animals, which often extend back for much of the life span. We discuss an alternative approach, the Multiple Trace Theory, which suggests that the HPC complex contributes to the retrieval of recent and remote episodic and context-dependent memories. According to thisview, such memory traces are represented as spatially distributed interactions between the HPC and neocortex that persist for as long as those memories exist. On the other hand, semantic, or context-free, memories can becomeindependent of the HPC as consolidation theory predicts. In support of this view, we report recent accounts of relatively flat RA gradients in autobiographical and spatial detail loss in patients and animal models with extensive bilateral HPC lesions. By comparison, temporally graded RA was observed in tests of semantic and context-free memory. We also report neuroimagingstudies in which hippocampal activity, elicited during recollection of autobiographical memories, did not distinguish recent from remote episodes. Our discussion suggests ways to reconcile discrepancies in the literature andguide predictions of the occurrence of flat versus temporally limited gradients of remote episodic and semantic memory loss following lesions to HPC. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

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Documento generato il 12/07/20 alle ore 11:55:26