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Titolo:
Depression in the workplace: Costs and barriers to treatment
Autore:
Goldberg, RJ; Steury, S;
Indirizzi:
Rhode Isl Hosp, Providence, RI 02905 USA Rhode Isl Hosp Providence RI USA02905 Isl Hosp, Providence, RI 02905 USA Brown Univ, Providence, RI 02912 USA Brown Univ Providence RI USA 02912Brown Univ, Providence, RI 02912 USA Miriam Hosp, Providence, RI 02906 USA Miriam Hosp Providence RI USA 02906Miriam Hosp, Providence, RI 02906 USA Georgetown Univ, Sch Med, Dept Mental Hlth, Washington, DC USA Georgetown Univ Washington DC USA , Dept Mental Hlth, Washington, DC USA
Titolo Testata:
PSYCHIATRIC SERVICES
fascicolo: 12, volume: 52, anno: 2001,
pagine: 1639 - 1643
SICI:
1075-2730(200112)52:12<1639:DITWCA>2.0.ZU;2-H
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
NATIONAL-COMORBIDITY-SURVEY; MAJOR DEPRESSION; DISABILITY; CARE; PREVALENCE; COMMUNITY;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Clinical Medicine
Citazioni:
16
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Goldberg, RJ Rhode Isl Hosp, 593 Eddy St, Providence, RI 02905 USA Rhode Isl Hosp 593 Eddy St Providence RI USA 02905 02905 USA
Citazione:
R.J. Goldberg e S. Steury, "Depression in the workplace: Costs and barriers to treatment", PSYCH SERV, 52(12), 2001, pp. 1639-1643

Abstract

Surveys estimate that 1.8 to 3.6 percent of workers in the U.S. labor force suffer from major depression. Depression has a significant impact on vocational functioning. Seventeen to 21 percent of the workforce experiences short-term disability during any given year, and 37 to 48 percent of workers with depression experience short-term disability. Studies indicate that treating workplace depression provides favorable cost offsets for employers, although a number of methodological issues have influenced the interpretation of these findings. In addition to disability costs, cost analyses need toinclude lost wages and indirect costs to employers, such as the costs of hiring and training new employees. In general, employers are not aware of the extent of the indirect costs of untreated depression. They have mistaken assumptions about the availability of effective treatment, and they are unaware of how often depression contributes to worker disability. The workers'compensation system and the courts have been slow to recognize depression as a work-related disability, and as a result employers have few incentivesto treat and prevent workplace depression.

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Documento generato il 25/01/20 alle ore 09:27:05