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Titolo:
Intracranial surgery: To shave or not to shave?
Autore:
Miller, JJ; Weber, PC; Patel, S; Ramey, J;
Indirizzi:
Med Univ S Carolina, Dept Otolaryngol Communicat Sci, Charleston, SC 29425USA Med Univ S Carolina Charleston SC USA 29425 Sci, Charleston, SC 29425USA Med Univ S Carolina, Dept Surg, Charleston, SC 29425 USA Med Univ S Carolina Charleston SC USA 29425 urg, Charleston, SC 29425 USA
Titolo Testata:
OTOLOGY & NEUROTOLOGY
fascicolo: 6, volume: 22, anno: 2001,
pagine: 908 - 911
SICI:
1531-7129(200111)22:6<908:ISTSON>2.0.ZU;2-S
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
PREOPERATIVE HAIR REMOVAL; NEUROSURGERY; PROPHYLAXIS; INFECTION; WOUNDS; TRIAL;
Keywords:
craniotomy; surgical skin preparation; postoperative wound infection;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Citazioni:
18
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Weber, PC Med Univ S Carolina, Dept Otolaryngol & Communicat Sci, 150 Ashley Ave,Rutledge Tower Annex, Charleston, SC 29425 USA Med Univ S Carolina 150 Ashley Ave,Rutledge Tower Annex Charleston SC USA 29425
Citazione:
J.J. Miller et al., "Intracranial surgery: To shave or not to shave?", OTOL NEURO, 22(6), 2001, pp. 908-911

Abstract

Objective: In an effort to improve patient confidentiality as well as cosmesis, the authors have stopped shaving for all intracranial procedures. Theobjective was to determine whether this lack of shaving increased the postoperative infection rate. Design: A retrospective study was performed comparing all intracranial surgical procedures performed in the last 2 1/2 years, when hair was not shaved, with the infection rate in patients who did have their hair shaved in the preceding 3 1/2 years. Setting: An academic tertiary care referral center. Patients: Every patient (children and adults) who underwent an intracranial procedure by the skull base surgery team was included. Similar patient demographics were used for the hair-shaved group. Intervention(s): Intracranial procedures consisted of acoustic tumor removal, vestibular nerve sections, skull base surgery procedures, vascular decompressions, and craniotomies for benign and malignant tumors. Main Outcome Measures: The most essential criterion was to determine whether postoperative wound infection developed in a patient. This was documented as either minor (stitch abscess or wound dehiscence), moderate (wound breakdown requiring inpatient or outpatient therapy, such as oral or intravenous antibiotics), or severe (significant wound breakdown that required hospitalization, with surgical debridement and antibiotics). Results: In all, 150 patients were not shaved for their intracranial procedures;, postoperative wound infections developed in 11 (7%). The infectionswere minor (6), moderate (5), and severe (0). By comparison, 100 patients undergoing intracranial procedures had their hair shaved. In this group, the number of infections noted was 6 (6%). Their categorization into mild, moderate, and severe was 4, 2, and 0, respectively. Statistical analysis did not reveal any significant difference between the two infection rates. Conclusions: The rate of Postoperative wound infection was statistically no greater when the hair was shaved than when it was not. Thus, for patient confidentiality as well as patient esteem, we recommend not shaving hair for intracranial procedures.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 01/04/20 alle ore 19:11:28