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Titolo:
Diet and consumption rates of overwintering YOY striped bass, Morone saxatilis, in the Hudson River
Autore:
Hurst, TP; Conover, DO;
Indirizzi:
SUNY Stony Brook, Marine Sci Res Ctr, Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA SUNY StonyBrook Stony Brook NY USA 11794 Ctr, Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA
Titolo Testata:
FISHERY BULLETIN
fascicolo: 4, volume: 99, anno: 2001,
pagine: 545 - 553
SICI:
0090-0656(200110)99:4<545:DACROO>2.0.ZU;2-P
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
GASTRIC EVACUATION RATES; JUVENILE SALMON; DAILY RATION; BROWN TROUT; SIZE; ESTUARY; WINTER; ENERGETICS; MORTALITY; GROWTH;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Agriculture,Biology & Environmental Sciences
Citazioni:
51
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Hurst, TP SUNY Stony Brook, Marine Sci Res Ctr, Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA SUNY Stony Brook Stony Brook NY USA 11794 y Brook, NY 11794 USA
Citazione:
T.P. Hurst e D.O. Conover, "Diet and consumption rates of overwintering YOY striped bass, Morone saxatilis, in the Hudson River", FISH B, 99(4), 2001, pp. 545-553

Abstract

Starvation is often proposed as the mechanism of size-dependent mortality of overwintering temperate fishes, yet little is known about the energeticsof fish at low temperatures. Young-of-the-year (YOY) Hudson River striped bass (Morone saxatilis) suffer a winter energy deficit and experience size-selective winter mortality in some years that may influence recruitment. Tobetter understand the role of energetic stress in winter mortality, we determined diet composition and measured consumption rates of wild fish. Gastric evacuation rates were measured in the laboratory at 2 degrees, 5 degrees, 8 degrees, and 11 degreesC. Measured evacuation rates for YOY striped bass were among the lowest reported, with 25% of the initial meal remaining after 150 hours at 2 degreesC. Variation in evacuation rate data increased astemperature decreased. Diets of fish captured in winter were dominated by gammarid amphipods and shrimp species. Gut fullness ranged from 0% to 7%, averaging 0.4% body weight. Evacuation rates, gut fullness values, and rivertemperatures were combined to estimate daily consumption rates on 29 datesover five winters. Consumption estimates ranged from 0% to 0.29%bw/day andwere generally higher in early winter than in late winter and not correlated with river temperatures. Stomach fullness was negatively correlated withthe level of lipid energy reserves at the individual level. The patterns may reflect an internal control on appetite, or a depression of prey availability in late winter. These findings indicate that the potential for winterstarvation may be influenced by both internal and external constraints on consumption rate.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 13/08/20 alle ore 13:55:30