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Titolo:
Does the thermal environment influence vigilance behavior in dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis)? An approach using standard operative temperature
Autore:
Boysen, AF; Lima, SL; Bakken, GS;
Indirizzi:
Indiana State Univ, Dept Life Sci, Terre Haute, IN 47809 USA Indiana StateUniv Terre Haute IN USA 47809 ci, Terre Haute, IN 47809 USA
Titolo Testata:
JOURNAL OF THERMAL BIOLOGY
fascicolo: 6, volume: 26, anno: 2001,
pagine: 605 - 612
SICI:
0306-4565(200111)26:6<605:DTTEIV>2.0.ZU;2-B
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
GROUP-SIZE; AIR-TEMPERATURE; PREDATION; METABOLISM; REDSHANKS; FLOCKS; BIRDS; RISK;
Keywords:
vigilance; anti-predator behavior; thermal stress; standard operative temperature; thermal sensor; Junco hyemalis;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Agriculture,Biology & Environmental Sciences
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
30
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Bakken, GS Indiana State Univ, Dept Life Sci, Terre Haute, IN 47809 USA Indiana State Univ Terre Haute IN USA 47809 aute, IN 47809 USA
Citazione:
A.F. Boysen et al., "Does the thermal environment influence vigilance behavior in dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis)? An approach using standard operative temperature", J THERM BIO, 26(6), 2001, pp. 605-612

Abstract

One might expect that increased thermal stress would cause wintering birdsto forage faster in order to meet the increased metabolic demand. Faster foraging should, in turn, lead to a reduction in vigilance, since feeding and vigilance are mutually antagonistic activities. We examined these intuitive behavioral expectations using newly developed standard operative temperature sensors designed specifically to characterize the thermal effect of the microclimate environment (rain excluded) on wintering dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis). These sensors allowed us to distinguish the behavioral effects of thermal stress from non-thermal effects associated with micro meteorological conditions (e,g. wind noise). Our analysis indicated that neither thermal nor non-thermal aspects of the physical environment influenced the proportion of time spent vigilant by juncos. However, the rate of food ingestion (measured as pecking rate) exhibited a negative correlation with thermal stress per se. This unexpected result may reflect the effect of thermalstress on feeding posture, peripheral muscle cooling, or both. The effect of thermal stress on pecking rate was nevertheless minor in comparison to the effect of flock size, which exerted by far the largest effect on both vigilance and pecking rate. Our overall results suggest that birds experiencing thermal stress will not necessarily lower their vigilance, but rather increase feeding bout length to compensate for the greater metabolic demand. This interpretation is consistent with theoretical models of vigilance in anon-time-limited environment, and may help explain the contradictory results to date on the effect of thermal stress on vigilance. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

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Documento generato il 05/04/20 alle ore 03:29:36