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Titolo:
The social context of smoking among African-American and white adolescentsin Baltimore City
Autore:
Gittelsohn, J; Roche, KM; Alexander, CS; Tassler, P;
Indirizzi:
Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Hyg & Publ Hlth, Dept Int Hlth, Div Human Nutr, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA Johns Hopkins Univ Baltimore MD USA 21205 n Nutr, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Hyg & Publ Hlth, Dept Populat & Family Hlth Sci, Baltimore, MD 21218 USA Johns Hopkins Univ Baltimore MD USA 21218 th Sci, Baltimore, MD 21218 USA Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Hyg & Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Baltimore, MD 21218 USA Johns Hopkins Univ Baltimore MD USA 21218 demiol, Baltimore, MD 21218 USA
Titolo Testata:
ETHNICITY & HEALTH
fascicolo: 3-4, volume: 6, anno: 2001,
pagine: 211 - 225
SICI:
1355-7858(200108/11)6:3-4<211:TSCOSA>2.0.ZU;2-F
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
CIGARETTE-SMOKING; PREDICTORS; BEHAVIOR;
Keywords:
smoking; adolescents; urban; qualitative research; social context;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Citazioni:
14
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Gittelsohn, J Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Hyg & Publ Hlth, Dept Int Hlth, Div Human Nutr, Room 2041,615 N Wolfe St, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA Johns HopkinsUniv Room 2041,615 N Wolfe St Baltimore MD USA 21205
Citazione:
J. Gittelsohn et al., "The social context of smoking among African-American and white adolescentsin Baltimore City", ETHN HEALTH, 6(3-4), 2001, pp. 211-225

Abstract

Objective. To describe and understand variations in social influences on smoking behavior among African-American and white male and female adolescents in Baltimore City, USA. Design. A qualitative study where adolescents, both smokers and non-smokers, were interviewed individually (n = 21) and participated in focus groups (n = 18 focus groups, 3-10 participants per group). Results. Social contexts emerged as most relevant and salient themes related to smoking behavior. White females perceived the most permissive parental messages around smoking, while males, especially African-American males, reported receiving the strictest parental sanctions. Females' need to fit in with peers contrasted with males' being coerced to smoke. Possible reasons for African-Ainericans' non-use of cigarettes include a desire not to disrespect parents and being turned off by parental addiction to nicotine. Alladolescents cited the school's lax anti-smoking policy as a reason teens smoke at school. Conclusion. Interventions targeted at schools and families offer promise for reducing adolescent cigarette use.

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Documento generato il 26/01/20 alle ore 22:17:41