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Titolo:
Prolonged colonization with vancomycin-resistant enterococcus faecium in long-term care patients and the significance of "clearance"
Autore:
Baden, LR; Thiemke, W; Skolnik, A; Chambers, R; Strymish, J; Gold, HS; Moellering, RC; Eliopoulos, GM;
Indirizzi:
Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Div Infect Dis, Boston, MA 02215 USA Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr Boston MA USA 02215 s, Boston, MA 02215 USA Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Brockton W Roxbury Vet Adm Med Ctr, Boston, MA USA Harvard Univ Boston MA USA ton W Roxbury Vet Adm Med Ctr, Boston, MA USA
Titolo Testata:
CLINICAL INFECTIOUS DISEASES
fascicolo: 10, volume: 33, anno: 2001,
pagine: 1654 - 1660
SICI:
1058-4838(20011115)33:10<1654:PCWVEF>2.0.ZU;2-I
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
FIELD GEL-ELECTROPHORESIS; HOSPITALIZED-PATIENTS; UNITED-STATES; DRUG-THERAPY; INFECTION; BACTEREMIA; HUMANS; SUSCEPTIBILITY; IDENTIFICATION; TN1546;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
38
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Baden, LR Brigham & Womens Hosp, Div Infect Dis, PBB-A400,15 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA Brigham & Womens Hosp PBB-A400,15 Francis St Boston MA USA 02115
Citazione:
L.R. Baden et al., "Prolonged colonization with vancomycin-resistant enterococcus faecium in long-term care patients and the significance of "clearance"", CLIN INF D, 33(10), 2001, pp. 1654-1660

Abstract

Little is known about the persistence of colonization with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE) in the nononcologic, non-intensive care unit patient. We studied all patients who had VRE isolated on greater than orequal to2 occasions of >1 year apart (Study A) and those who had been "cleared" of VRE colonization after 3 negative stool cultures (Study B). Twelvepatients had stored VRE isolates recovered >1 year apart (Study A), and 58% of paired isolates were genotypically related according to pulsed field gel electrophoresis patterns. In Study B, stool samples were obtained weeklyfrom 21 "cleared" patients for 5 weeks, which revealed that 24% were VRE positive. For these culture-positive patients, 72% of the cultures failed todetect VRE. Recent antibiotic use was significantly more common in the culture-positive patients, as compared with culture-negative patients (P=.003). Colonization with VRE may persist for years, even if the results of intercurrent surveillance stool and index site cultures are negative. Cultures for detection of VRE in stool samples obtained from patients declared "cleared" are insensitive.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 04/04/20 alle ore 13:49:10