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Titolo:
Alterations of medial preoptic area neurons following pregnancy and pregnancy-like steroidal treatment in the rat
Autore:
Keyser-Marcus, L; Stafisso-Sandoz, G; Gerecke, K; Jasnow, A; Nightingale, L; Lambert, KG; Gatewood, J; Kinsley, CH;
Indirizzi:
Univ Richmond, Dept Psychol, Richmond, VA 23173 USA Univ Richmond Richmond VA USA 23173 Dept Psychol, Richmond, VA 23173 USA Randolph Macon Coll, Dept Psychol, Ashland, VA 23005 USA Randolph Macon Coll Ashland VA USA 23005 t Psychol, Ashland, VA 23005 USA
Titolo Testata:
BRAIN RESEARCH BULLETIN
fascicolo: 6, volume: 55, anno: 2001,
pagine: 737 - 745
SICI:
0361-9230(200108)55:6<737:AOMPAN>2.0.ZU;2-6
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
DENDRITIC SPINE DENSITY; MATERNAL-BEHAVIOR; QUANTITATIVE-ANALYSIS; SYNAPTIC PLASTICITY; PLACENTAL-LACTOGEN; SEX-DIFFERENCES; NEURAL ACTIVITY; ESTROUS-CYCLE; FEMALE RATS; ESTRADIOL;
Keywords:
cell body/perikaryon/soma; hypothalamus; learning and memory; maternal behavior; neuronal plasticity;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
62
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Kinsley, CH Univ Richmond, Dept Psychol, 103 Richmond Hall, Richmond, VA 23173 USA Univ Richmond 103 Richmond Hall Richmond VA USA 23173 3173 USA
Citazione:
L. Keyser-Marcus et al., "Alterations of medial preoptic area neurons following pregnancy and pregnancy-like steroidal treatment in the rat", BRAIN RES B, 55(6), 2001, pp. 737-745

Abstract

There is a marked increase in the maternal behavior displayed by a female rat following pregnancy-due primarily to exposure to the gonadal hormones progesterone and estradiol (P and E-2, respectively). We examined Golgi-Cox silver-stained, Vibratome-sectioned neurons visualized and traced using computerized microscopy and image analysis. In Part One, we examined the hormonal-neural concomitants in the medial preoptic area (mPOA), an area of the brain that regulates maternal behavior, by comparing cell body size (area in mu M (2); also referred to as soma and perikaryon) in the mPOA and cortexof five groups (n = 4-6/group) of ovariectomized (OVX-minus), diestrous, sequential P and E-2-treated (P+E-2), late-pregnant, and lactating rats; forPart Two, we examined a subset of mPOA neurons, which were traced in theirentirety, from these same subjects. In Part One, whereas there was no difference between OVX-minus and diestrous females, both had smaller somal areas compared to OVX+P+E-2-treated and late-pregnant females. The area of the soma returned to diestrous/OVX-minus levels in the lactating females. We found no change among the five groups in area of cell body in cortical neurons, which generally lack steroid receptors. In Part Two, which included a more detailed morphometric analysis of mPOA neurons, we examined several additional measures of dendritic structure, including number of proximal dendritic branches (the largest proximal dendrite was defined as the one with thelargest diameter leaving the soma); cumulative length of the largest proximal dendrite; area of the cell body; number of basal dendrites; cumulative basal dendritic length; number of basal dendritic branches; and branch-point (distance from cell body to first branch of largest proximal dendrite). Again, we found similar effects on cell body size as in Part One, together with effects on number of basal dendritic branches and cumulative basal dendritic length in pregnant and P+E-2-treated groups compared to OVX, diestrous, and lactating. An increase in somal area denotes increased cellular activity, and stimulatory effects on additional neuronal variables represents modifications in information processing capacity. Pregnancy and its attendant hormonal exposure, therefore, may stimulate neurons in the mPOA, which then contribute (in an as yet undetermined manner) to the display of maternalbehavior. During the postpartum lactational period, when cues from pups primarily maintain maternal attention, the neuronal soma appears to return toa pre-pregnancy, non-hormonally dependent state, whereas other aspects of the dendrite remain altered. Collectively, these data demonstrate a striking plasticity in the brains of females that may be reflected in modifications in behavior. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Inc.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 22/01/20 alle ore 06:29:27