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Titolo:
Evolution and development of the vertebrate ear
Autore:
Fritzsch, B; Beisel, KW;
Indirizzi:
Creighton Univ, Dept Biomed Sci, Omaha, NE 68178 USA Creighton Univ OmahaNE USA 68178 v, Dept Biomed Sci, Omaha, NE 68178 USA BTNRH, Omaha, NE USA BTNRH Omaha NE USABTNRH, Omaha, NE USA
Titolo Testata:
BRAIN RESEARCH BULLETIN
fascicolo: 6, volume: 55, anno: 2001,
pagine: 711 - 721
SICI:
0361-9230(200108)55:6<711:EADOTV>2.0.ZU;2-P
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
COCHLEAR HAIR-CELLS; INNER-EAR; CAENORHABDITIS-ELEGANS; MECHANOSENSORY TRANSDUCTION; ACETYLCHOLINE-RECEPTOR; ESCHERICHIA-COLI; GENETIC-CONTROL; ION CHANNELS; NEURAL CREST; HEARING-LOSS;
Keywords:
ear evolution; ear development; molecular evolution; bHLH genes; FGF genes;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
93
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Fritzsch, B Creighton Univ, Dept Biomed Sci, Omaha, NE 68178 USA CreightonUniv Omaha NE USA 68178 ed Sci, Omaha, NE 68178 USA
Citazione:
B. Fritzsch e K.W. Beisel, "Evolution and development of the vertebrate ear", BRAIN RES B, 55(6), 2001, pp. 711-721

Abstract

This review outlines major aspects of development and evolution of the ear, specifically addressing issues of cell fate commitment and the emerging molecular governance of these decisions. Available data support the notion of homology of subsets of mechanosensors across phyla (proprioreceptive mechanosensory neurons in insects, hair cells in vertebrates). It is argued that this conservation is primarily related to the specific transducing environment needed to achieve mechanosensation. Achieving this requires highly conserved transcription factors that regulate the expression of the relevant structural genes for mechanosensory transduction. While conserved at the level of some cell fate assignment genes (atonal and its mammalian homologue), the ear has also radically reorganized its development by implementing genes used for cell fate assignment in other parts of the developing nervous systems (e.g., neurogenin 1) and by evolving novel sets of genes specifically associated with the novel formation of sensory neurons that contact haircells (neurotrophins and their receptors). Numerous genes have been identified that regulate morphogenesis, but there is only one common feature thatemerges at the moment: the ear appears to have co-opted genes from a largevariety of other parts of the developing body (forebrain, limbs, kidneys) and establishes, in combination with existing transcription factors, an environment in which those genes govern novel, ear-related morphogenetic aspects. The ear thus represents a unique mix of highly conserved developmental elements combined with co-opted and newly evolved developmental elements. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Inc.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 25/11/20 alle ore 07:37:26