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Titolo:
Beliefs about the causes of weight change in the Australian population
Autore:
Jackson, M; Ball, K; Crawford, D;
Indirizzi:
Deakin Univ, Sch Hlth Sci, Geelong, Vic 3125, Australia Deakin Univ Geelong Vic Australia 3125 Sci, Geelong, Vic 3125, Australia
Titolo Testata:
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBESITY
fascicolo: 10, volume: 25, anno: 2001,
pagine: 1512 - 1516
SICI:
0307-0565(200110)25:10<1512:BATCOW>2.0.ZU;2-7
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
OVERWEIGHT; COMMUNITY; OBESITY; WOMEN; GAIN; MEN;
Keywords:
weight gain; weight loss; gender; beliefs; perceptions;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
19
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Crawford, D Deakin Univ, Sch Hlth Sci, 221 Burwood Highway, Geelong, Vic 3125, Australia Deakin Univ 221 Burwood Highway Geelong Vic Australia 3125 lia
Citazione:
M. Jackson et al., "Beliefs about the causes of weight change in the Australian population", INT J OBES, 25(10), 2001, pp. 1512-1516

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To describe self-reported weight change and beliefs about the causes of weight change and to examine whether these vary by sex and weight status. DESIGN: This cross-sectional population study examined data from the 1995 Australian National Health and Nutrition Surveys. SUBJECTS: A total of 10 624 randomly-selected adults provided data. MEASURES: Objectively measured height and weight, perceptions of current weight status, self-reported weight change over the past year, and reasons for weight change. RESULTS: Thirty-five percent of participants reported a weight gain in thelast 12 months, with females, and those already overweight more likely to report a recent increase in weight. Approximately one in five participants reported a recent weight loss. Those who had recently gained weight were more likely to perceive themselves as overweight regardless of actual weight status. Commonly reported reasons for weight gain included a change in physical activity level (52% males and 35% females) and a change in the amount of food/drink consumed (30% males, 27% females). Similar reasons were givenfor weight loss. CONCLUSIONS: Findings of widespread reported weight gain, particularly among those already overweight, suggest Australia's obesity epidemic may be worsening. Strategies are urgently required to better inform individuals about the factors impacting on their weight in order to prevent further weight gain.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 28/01/20 alle ore 21:06:01