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Titolo:
Effects of maternal identity and incubation temperature on Snapping Turtle(Chelydra serpentina) growth
Autore:
Steyermark, AC; Spotila, JR;
Indirizzi:
Drexel Univ, Dept Biosci & Biotechnol, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA Drexel Univ Philadelphia PA USA 19104 technol, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA Drexel Univ, Sch Environm Sci Engn & Policy, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA Drexel Univ Philadelphia PA USA 19104 Policy, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA
Titolo Testata:
FUNCTIONAL ECOLOGY
fascicolo: 5, volume: 15, anno: 2001,
pagine: 624 - 632
SICI:
0269-8463(200110)15:5<624:EOMIAI>2.0.ZU;2-C
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
OPTIMAL EGG SIZE; SEX DETERMINATION; CLUTCH SIZE; PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY; THERMAL PHYSIOLOGY; SCELOPORUS LIZARDS; GENETIC-VARIATION; HYLA-GRATIOSA; POPULATION; ECOLOGY;
Keywords:
maternal effects; posthatching growth; phenotypic variation; standard metabolic rate;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Agriculture,Biology & Environmental Sciences
Citazioni:
65
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Steyermark, AC Drexel Univ, Dept Biosci & Biotechnol, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA Drexel Univ Philadelphia PA USA 19104 elphia, PA 19104 USA
Citazione:
A.C. Steyermark e J.R. Spotila, "Effects of maternal identity and incubation temperature on Snapping Turtle(Chelydra serpentina) growth", FUNCT ECOL, 15(5), 2001, pp. 624-632

Abstract

1. Individual variation in physiological traits may have important consequences for offspring survival rates and adult fitness. Variance in offspringphenotypes is due to interindividual differences in genotype, environment or maternal effects. This study examined the contributions of family identity, egg incubation environment and maternal effects to individual variationin growth rates in the common Snapping Turtle, Chelydra serpentina.2. The growth rates of 254 individuals, representing 24 clutches, were measured for approximately 6 months.3. Mean growth rate for all individuals was 7.21 mg g(-1) day(-1)(= day(-1)) (SE = 0.12 day(-1), range = -3.70-13.03 day(-1)). Growth rates varied significantly among clutches, ranging from 5.76 to 9.20 day(-1), indicating that family identity, and possibly genotype, significantly affects posthatching growth. In general, larger eggs produced larger hatchlings, and individuals that were larger at birth were larger at 175 days of age. Thus, maternal effects were significant throughout the entire growth measurement period.4. In contrast to results from previous studies, egg incubation temperature did not significantly affect individual growth.5. Because all individuals received similar treatments and were in similarenvironments posthatching, our results suggest that there is a genetic component to growth rate, but that egg incubation temperature does not affect growth.

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Documento generato il 08/07/20 alle ore 00:43:20