Catalogo Articoli (Spogli Riviste)

OPAC HELP

Titolo:
Socioeconomic differences in use of medical care and antibiotics among schoolchildren in Sweden
Autore:
Hjern, A; Haglund, B; Rosen, M;
Indirizzi:
Natl Board Hlth & Welf, Ctr Epidemiol, S-10630 Stockholm, Sweden Natl Board Hlth & Welf Stockholm Sweden S-10630 -10630 Stockholm, Sweden Huddinge Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden Huddinge Univ Hosp Stockholm Sweden t, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Sci, Umea, Sweden Umea Univ Umea Sweden mea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Sci, Umea, Sweden
Titolo Testata:
EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
fascicolo: 3, volume: 11, anno: 2001,
pagine: 280 - 283
SICI:
1101-1262(200109)11:3<280:SDIUOM>2.0.ZU;2-#
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
MORTALITY;
Keywords:
child health; equity; health services; medical care; Sweden;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Clinical Medicine
Citazioni:
12
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Hjern, A Natl Board Hlth & Welf, Ctr Epidemiol, S-10630 Stockholm, Sweden Natl Board Hlth & Welf Stockholm Sweden S-10630 ockholm, Sweden
Citazione:
A. Hjern et al., "Socioeconomic differences in use of medical care and antibiotics among schoolchildren in Sweden", EUR J PUB H, 11(3), 2001, pp. 280-283

Abstract

Background: Studies of mortality among children and adults in Sweden have demonstrated considerable socioeconomic differences. This paper describes socioeconomic patterns of physical morbidity and use of medical care and antibiotics in schoolchildren in Sweden. Methods: A cross-sectional study based on parent interviews from the Swedish Survey of Living Conditions in 1996-1997 was used. The study population consisted of 3,557 children aged 6-15 years. Results: Forty-five percent of the schoolchildren in the study were reported to have been absent from school because of illness at least once during the previous three months, 8% were taking regular medication and 10% had ever suffered from a chronic disorder. There were no indications of socioeconomic differences according to the education of the responding parent in morbidity or use of consultations with a physician. However, children infamilies where the responding parents had primary education only consumed antibiotics less often (OR 0.7 and Cl: 0.5-0.9) when compared to children in families with post-secondary education. Children in rural areas used consultations with a physician less often and consumed less antibiotics (adjusted OR 0.7 and Cl: 0.4-0.9 and 0.7 and Cl: 0.5-0.9 respectively). Conclusion: No obvious patterns of socioeconomic inequality in physical morbidity or use of medical care were identified among schoolchildren in Sweden. Furtherstudies are needed in order to explain the social inequality in consumption of antibiotics among schoolchildren in Sweden and to describe social and regional patterns of psychiatric, behavioural and psychosomatic morbidity.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 27/01/20 alle ore 13:56:13