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Titolo:
Telephone prescribing of antibiotics - General practitioners' views and reflections
Autore:
Bjornsdottir, I; Hansen, EH;
Indirizzi:
Royal Danish Sch Pharm, Dept Social Pharm, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark Royal Danish Sch Pharm Copenhagen Denmark DK-2100 00 Copenhagen, Denmark
Titolo Testata:
EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
fascicolo: 3, volume: 11, anno: 2001,
pagine: 260 - 263
SICI:
1101-1262(200109)11:3<260:TPOA-G>2.0.ZU;2-S
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
MANAGEMENT;
Keywords:
antibiotics; GPs' reflections and attitudes; Iceland; qualitative methods; telephone prescribing;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Clinical Medicine
Citazioni:
16
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Bjornsdottir, I Holtaseli 36, IS-109 Reykjavik, Iceland Holtaseli 36 Reykjavik Iceland IS-109 Reykjavik, Iceland
Citazione:
I. Bjornsdottir e E.H. Hansen, "Telephone prescribing of antibiotics - General practitioners' views and reflections", EUR J PUB H, 11(3), 2001, pp. 260-263

Abstract

Background: In this era of increasing problems with resistance, rational prescribing of antibiotics is extremely important. Therefore, rationales forprescribing require analyses. The objective of this study was to explore general practitioners' (GPs') reasons for prescribing antibiotics by telephone. Methods: Qualitative analysis of semistructured interviews with and observations of GPs in Iceland enquiring about the rationale for prescribing antibiotics was used. Ten GPs were interviewed for 45 min to 2 h each including three who were observed between 3 and 10 h. Results: The GPs generally indicated a restrictive attitude to telephone prescribing, although they all gave examples of their prescribing by telephone. The prescribing was mostly but not always based on some kind of diagnosis. The factors influencing diagnosis and prescribing were largely non-clinical: knowledge of the patients as persons, including their complaint threshold, confidence in their descriptions, the GPs' communication strategies and the travelling distance between patients and GPs. The clinical factors were the patients' description of signs and symptoms and knowledge of their history. Prescriptions not based on diagnosis were 'therapeutic trial' or GP-approved self-medication. Sometimes, the Us requested to see a patient even though the diagnosis was based on history, signs and symptoms. Conclusions: Multiple factors affected the decision-making process when antibiotics were prescribed by telephone, most of which were non-clinical. The diagnosis, if there was one, was generally presumptive. GPs' general attitudes correlated well with current knowledge but were contrasted by the reality of their daily work conditions.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 26/01/20 alle ore 17:06:40