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Titolo:
The relationship between ice thickness and northern hardwood tree damage during ice storms
Autore:
Proulx, OJ; Greene, DF;
Indirizzi:
Concordia Univ, Dept Geog, Montreal, PQ H3G 1M8, Canada Concordia Univ Montreal PQ Canada H3G 1M8 g, Montreal, PQ H3G 1M8, Canada
Titolo Testata:
CANADIAN JOURNAL OF FOREST RESEARCH-REVUE CANADIENNE DE RECHERCHE FORESTIERE
fascicolo: 10, volume: 31, anno: 2001,
pagine: 1758 - 1767
SICI:
0045-5067(200110)31:10<1758:TRBITA>2.0.ZU;2-G
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
NATURAL DISTURBANCE REGIMES; FOREST; WISCONSIN;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Agriculture,Biology & Environmental Sciences
Citazioni:
47
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Greene, DF Concordia Univ, Dept Geog, 1455 Blvd Maisonneuve Ouest, Montreal, PQ H3G 1M8, Canada Concordia Univ 1455 Blvd Maisonneuve Ouest Montreal PQ Canada H3G 1M8
Citazione:
O.J. Proulx e D.F. Greene, "The relationship between ice thickness and northern hardwood tree damage during ice storms", CAN J FORES, 31(10), 2001, pp. 1758-1767

Abstract

The response of four tree species, Acer saccharum Marsh., Acer rubrum L., Populus tremuloides Michx., and Betula populifolia Marsh., to ice storm damage was studied in the northern hardwood forest of southern Quebec. The focus of the study was the impact of ice accretion on trees as a function of damage type and species at the stand and regional scales along a gradient ofice accumulation ranging from 2 to 88 mm radial thickness and to assess the role of the combined effect of ice and wind stress. Further, we estimate the return time for death resulting from ice storms in these forests. The study showed that the magnitude of ice accumulation was the primary determinant of tree damage (measured as the mean percentage of individual tree canopy removed) and that tree size was the primary determinant of damage type (bending, snapping, or substantial branch loss). Stand position (edge versusinterior) did not influence susceptibility to damage. The research demonstrated that edge and slope trees bent or snapped in the direction dictated by crown asymmetry. We have no evidence that the modest winds during this icing event played a major role. Lastly, we couple the return time for a given ice thickness with the probability of severe damage to argue that (i) canopy tree mortality from icing is primarily due to glaze accumulations of moderate rarity (around 12-35 mm of ice) rather than extraordinary events such as 1998 and (ii) ice storms are likely the greatest single source of canopy tree mortality in the hardwood forests of southern Quebec with an estimated return time for death of about 250 years.

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Documento generato il 11/07/20 alle ore 17:07:25