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Titolo:
A randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical trial of high-dose supplementation with vitamins C and E and beta carotene for age-related cataract and vision loss - AREDS Report No. 9
Autore:
Kassoff, A; Kassoff, J; Buehler, J; Eglow, M; Kaufman, F; Mehu, M; Kieval, S; Mairs, M; Graig, B; Quattrocchi, A; Jones, D; Locatelli, J; Ruby, A; Capone, A; Garretson, B; Hassan, T; Trese, MT; Williams, GA; Regan, V; Manatrey, P; Streasick, P; Szydlowski, L; McIver, F; Bridges, C; Stanely, C; Cumming, K; Lewis, B; Zajechowski, M; Margherio, RR; Cox, MS; Werner, JC; Falk, R; Siedlak, P; Neubert, C; Klein, ML; Stout, JT; OMalley, A; Lauer, AK; Robertson, JE; Wilson, DJ; Beardsley, C; Anderson, H; Wallace, P; Smith, G; Howard, S; Dreyer, RF; Ma, C; Chenoweth, RG; Zilis, JD; Johnson, M; Rice, P; Daniel, H; Crider, H; Parker, S; Sherman, K; Martin, DF; Aaberg, TM; Sternberg, P; Curtis, LT; Ju, B; Gilman, J; Myles, B; Strittman, S; Gentry, C; Yi, H; Capone, A; Lambert, M; Meredith, T; Aaberg, TM; Saperstein, D; Lim, JI; Stribling, B; Armiger, D; Swords, R; Orth, DH; Flood, TP; Civantos, J; deBustros, S; Packo, KH; Merrill, PT; Cohen, JA; Figliulo, C; Morrison, C; Bryant, DA; Doherty, D; McVicker, M; Drefcinski, T; Seddon, JM; Pinnolis, MK; Davis, N; Burton, I; Taitsel, T; Walsh, D; Snow, KK; Jones-Devonish, DA; Crouse, VD; Rosenberg, J; Chew, EY; Csaky, K; Ferris, FL; Shimel, KH; Woods, MA; Kuehl, EM; Ciatto, PF; Palmer, M; Babilonia-Ayukawa, G; Foster, GE; Goodman, L; Kim, YJ; Kivitz, IJ; Koutsandreas, D; LaReau, A; Mercer, RF; Nashwinter, R; McCarthy, SA; Ayres, LM; Lopez, P; Randalls, A; Friberg, TR; Eller, AW; Gorin, MB; Nixon, S; Mack, B; Curtin, DY; Ostroska, PP; Fijewski, E; Alexander, J; Paine, MK; Corbin, PS; Warnicki, J; Bressler, SB; Bressler, NM; Cassel, G; Finkelstein, D; Goldberg, M; Haller, JA; Ratner, L; Schachat, AP; Sherman, SH; Sunness, JS; Schenning, S; Sackett, C; Cain, D; Emmert, D; Herring, M; McDonald, J; Falk, R; Wheeler, S; Mcmillan, M; George, T; Elman, MJ; Ballinger, R; Betancourt, A; Glasser, D; Herr, M; Hirsh, D; Kilingsworth, D; Kohlhepp, P; Lammlein, J; Raden, RZ; Seff, R; Shuman, M; Starr, J; Carrigan, A; Sotirakos, P; Cain, T; Mathews, T; Ringrose, C; Chandra, SR; Gottlieb, JL; Ip, MS; Klein, R; Nork, TM; Stevens, TS; Blodi, BA; Altaweel, M; Klein, BEK; Olson, M; Soderling, B; Blatz, M; Perry-Raymond, JR; Burke, K; Knutson, G; Peterson, J; Krolnik, D; Harrison, R; Somers, G; Myers, FL; Wallow, I; Olsen, TW; Bresnik, G; De Venecia, G; Perkins, T; Walker, W; Miller, JL; Neider, M; Wabers, HD; Weber, G; Myers, HEL; Davis, MD; Klein, BEK; Klein, R; Hubbard, L; Neider, M; Wabers, HD; Magli, YL; Ansay, S; Armstrong, J; Lang, K; Badal, D; Geithman, PL; Miner, KD; Dohm, KL; Esser, B; Hurtenbach, C; Craanen, S; Webster, M; Elledge, J; Reed, S; Benz, W; Reimers, J; Fisher, MR; Gangnon, R; King, W; Gai, CY; Baliker, J; Carr, A; Osterby, K; Kastorff, L; Robinson, N; Onofrey, J; Glander, KE; Brickbauer, J; Miller, D; Sowell, A; Gunter, E; Bowman, B; Lindblad, AS; Milton, RC; Clemons, TE; Ederer, F; Gensler, G; Henning, A; Entler, G; McBee, W; Roberts, K; Stine, E; Berlin, SH; Tomlin, K; Pallas, S; Scholl, PR; Mengers, SA; Anand, R; Ferris, FL; Sperduto, RD; Kurinij, N; Chew, EY;
Indirizzi:
Eye Ctr Mem, Albany, NY USA Eye Ctr Mem Albany NY USAEye Ctr Mem, Albany, NY USA Emory Univ, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA Emory Univ Atlanta GA USA 30322Emory Univ, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA Ingalls Mem Hosp, Harvey, IL USA Ingalls Mem Hosp Harvey IL USAIngalls Mem Hosp, Harvey, IL USA Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirm, Boston, MA 02114 USA Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirm Boston MA USA 02114 , Boston, MA 02114 USA NEI, Ctr Clin, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA NEI Bethesda MD USA 20892NEI, Ctr Clin, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA Univ Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA USA Univ Pittsburgh Pittsburgh PA USAUniv Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA USA Johns Hopkins Med Inst, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA Johns Hopkins Med Inst Baltimore MD USA 21205 st, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA Elman Retina Grp PA, Baltimore, MD USA Elman Retina Grp PA Baltimore MD USA an Retina Grp PA, Baltimore, MD USA Univ Wisconsin, Reading Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA Univ Wisconsin MadisonWI USA 53706 n, Reading Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA Ctr Dis Control & Prevent, Genet Lab, Atlanta, GA USA Ctr Dis Control & Prevent Atlanta GA USA ent, Genet Lab, Atlanta, GA USA NEI, Project Off, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA NEI Bethesda MD USA 20892NEI, Project Off, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA
Titolo Testata:
ARCHIVES OF OPHTHALMOLOGY
fascicolo: 10, volume: 119, anno: 2001,
pagine: 1439 - 1452
SICI:
0003-9950(200110)119:10<1439:ARPCTO>2.0.ZU;2-F
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
OPACITIES CASE-CONTROL; LENS OPACITIES; CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE; ANTIOXIDANT VITAMINS; NUTRIENT INTAKE; EYE DISEASE; RISK; EXTRACTION; PHYSICIANS; NUTRITION;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
49
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Kassoff, A Eye Ctr Mem, Albany, NY USA Eye Ctr Mem Albany NY USAEye Ctr Mem, Albany, NY USA
Citazione:
A. Kassoff et al., "A randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical trial of high-dose supplementation with vitamins C and E and beta carotene for age-related cataract and vision loss - AREDS Report No. 9", ARCH OPHTH, 119(10), 2001, pp. 1439-1452

Abstract

Background: Experimental and observational data suggest that micronutrients with antioxidant capabilities may retard the development of age-related cataract. Objective: To evaluate the effect of a high-dose antioxidant formulation on the development and progression of age-related lens opacities and visual acuity loss. Design: The 11-center Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) was a double-masked clinical trial. Participants were randomly assigned to receive daily oral tablets containing either antioxidants (vitamin C, 500 mg; vitamin E, 400 IU; and beta carotene, 15 mg) or no antioxidants. Participants with more than a few small drusen were also randomly assigned to receive tablets with or without zinc (80 mg of zinc as zinc oxide) and copper (2 mg of copperas cupric oxide) as part of the age-related macular degeneration trial. Baseline and annual (starting at year 2) lens photographs were graded at a reading center for the severity of lens opacities using the AREDS cataract grading scale. Main Outcome Measures: Primary outcomes were (1) an increase from baselinein nuclear, cortical, or posterior subcapsular opacity grades or cataract surgery, and (2) at least moderate visual acuity loss from baseline (greater than or equal to 15 letters). Primary analyses used repeated-measures logistic regression with a statistical significance level of P = .01. Serum level measurements, medical histories, and mortality rates were used for safety monitoring. Results: Of 4757 participants enrolled, 4629 who were aged from 55 to 80 years had at least 1 natural lens present and were followed up for an average of 6.3 years. No statistically significant effect of the antioxidant formulation was seen on the development or progression of age-related lens opacities (odds ratio = 0.97, P = .55). There was also no statistically significant effect of treatment in reducing the risk of progression for any of the3 lens opacity types or for cataract surgery. For the 1117 participants with no age-related macular degeneration at baseline, no statistically significant difference was noted between treatment groups for at least moderate visual acuity loss. No statistically significant serious adverse effect was associated with treatment. Conclusion: Use of a high-dose formulation of vitamin C, vitamin E, and beta carotene in a relatively well-nourished older adult cohort had no apparent effect on the 7-year risk of development or progression of age-related lens opacities or visual acuity loss.

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Documento generato il 10/07/20 alle ore 03:13:48