Catalogo Articoli (Spogli Riviste)

OPAC HELP

Titolo:
Flood disturbance regimes influence rainbow trout invasion success among five holarctic regions
Autore:
Fausch, KD; Taniguchi, Y; Nakano, S; Grossman, GD; Townsend, CR;
Indirizzi:
Colorado State Univ, Dept Fishery & Wildlife Biol, Ft Collins, CO 80523 USA Colorado State Univ Ft Collins CO USA 80523 iol, Ft Collins, CO 80523 USA Yamaguchi Prefectural Univ, Dept Life & Environm Sci, Yamaguchi 7538502, Japan Yamaguchi Prefectural Univ Yamaguchi Japan 7538502 aguchi 7538502, Japan Kyoto Univ, Ctr Ecol Res, Otsu, Shiga 5202113, Japan Kyoto Univ Otsu Shiga Japan 5202113 Ecol Res, Otsu, Shiga 5202113, Japan Univ Georgia, Warnell Sch Forest Resources, Athens, GA 30602 USA Univ Georgia Athens GA USA 30602 h Forest Resources, Athens, GA 30602 USA Univ Otago, Dept Zool, Dunedin, New Zealand Univ Otago Dunedin New Zealand v Otago, Dept Zool, Dunedin, New Zealand
Titolo Testata:
ECOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS
fascicolo: 5, volume: 11, anno: 2001,
pagine: 1438 - 1455
SICI:
1051-0761(200110)11:5<1438:FDRIRT>2.0.ZU;2-8
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
SOUTHERN APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS; NEW-ZEALAND; ONCORHYNCHUS-MYKISS; FRESH-WATER; BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS; SPECIES TRAITS; UNITED-STATES; SALMO-TRUTTA; HABITAT TEMPLET; BROOK TROUT;
Keywords:
abiotic habitat filters; fish recruitment; floods and flood disturbance; habitat templet; Holarctic region; hydrologic regime; Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration; invasion biology; Oncorhynchus mykiss; rainbow trout; regional analysis; salmonids;
Tipo documento:
Review
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Agriculture,Biology & Environmental Sciences
Citazioni:
115
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Fausch, KD Colorado State Univ, Dept Fishery & Wildlife Biol, Ft Collins, CO 80523 USA Colorado State Univ Ft Collins CO USA 80523 lins, CO 80523 USA
Citazione:
K.D. Fausch et al., "Flood disturbance regimes influence rainbow trout invasion success among five holarctic regions", ECOL APPL, 11(5), 2001, pp. 1438-1455

Abstract

There is growing awareness that predicting biological invasions will require the development of conceptual models for specific taxa at appropriate scales. Salmonids are ideal taxa for testing factors that influence invasions, because large numbers have been introduced worldwide for long periods andtheir ecology is well known. We evaluated the hypothesis that, among regions with suitable water temperatures, environmental resistance from flood disturbances that wash away trout fry strongly influence invasion success of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), the most widely introduced fish species. We predicted that flow regimes in regions where rainbow trout invasions are successful would match those in their native range and would differ from those in regions where invasions are moderately successful or failed. We tested six specific predictions about how timing, predictability, frequency, duration, and annual variability of floods, as well as timing of low flows, will differ relative to timing of rainbow trout fry emergence among fiveHolarctic regions. Analysis of hydrologic regimes for eight rivers each inthe native range (Pacific Coast) and four regions where rainbow trout invasions varied from highly successful (Southern Appalachians) to moderate (Colorado, USA, and Hokkaido Island, Japan) or failed (Honshu Island) showed that winter flooding and summer low flows in Pacific Coast rivers that favorspring emergence of rainbow trout were closely matched by Southern Appalachian flow regimes. In contrast, the other three regions had spring or summer flooding that hampered rainbow trout recruitment to different degrees, and winter low flows. Rainbow trout invasion success was best explained by a match between timing of fry emergence and months of low flood probability. Alternatively, cold water temperatures, which hamper reproduction, and biotic interactions with brown trout (Salmo trutta) and whirling disease parasites may account for low invasion success in European regions. However, differences in genetic makeup of donor stocks and propagule pressure are unlikely mechanisms to explain invasions. Understanding how abiotic disturbances interact with timing of critical life history events to limit normative species will help ecologists develop more robust theories to predict invasion success.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 30/03/20 alle ore 19:39:23