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Titolo:
Is position "special" in visual attention? Evidence that top-down processes guide visual selection
Autore:
Gold, JM; Pratt, J;
Indirizzi:
Univ Toronto, Dept Psychol, Toronto, ON M5S 3G3, Canada Univ Toronto Toronto ON Canada M5S 3G3 ychol, Toronto, ON M5S 3G3, Canada
Titolo Testata:
CANADIAN JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-REVUE CANADIENNE DE PSYCHOLOGIE EXPERIMENTALE
fascicolo: 3, volume: 55, anno: 2001,
pagine: 261 - 270
SICI:
1196-1961(200109)55:3<261:IP"IVA>2.0.ZU;2-F
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
CONTROL SETTINGS; CAPTURE; SEARCH; COLOR; CONTINGENT; LOCATION; MODEL; SHAPE;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Citazioni:
23
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Pratt, J Univ Toronto, Dept Psychol, 100 St George St, Toronto, ON M5S 3G3, Canada Univ Toronto 100 St George St Toronto ON Canada M5S 3G3 3, Canada
Citazione:
J.M. Gold e J. Pratt, "Is position "special" in visual attention? Evidence that top-down processes guide visual selection", CAN J EXP P, 55(3), 2001, pp. 261-270

Abstract

The role of spatial position in selective visual processing has been the source of recent debate. Experiments by Tsal and Lavie (1988) and van der Heijden et al. (1996) have been designed to establish the status of position in visual selection. Tsa1 and Lavie found that observers tend to select letters from a briefly presented array according to position. Using the same paradigm, van der Heijden et al. found that observers tend to select according to colour, except under conditions of low contrast and unrestricted eye movements. The present study attempted to reconcile these findings by exploring the influence of top-down processes (task instructions) while explicitly controlling for eye movements. Experiment 1 demonstrated there was no inherent selection bias for stimuli similar to those used by van der Heijden et al., suggesting that the tendency to select according to colour found byvan der Heijden et al. was due to task demands. Experiment 2 further established the role of top-down factors by replicating the results of van der Heijden et al. with our stimuli, Experiment 3 demonstrated that selection can be switched from colour to position by changing the demands of the task. These results suggest that selection may be accounted for by task demands (e.g., instructions) with no priority access for position information.

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Documento generato il 07/04/20 alle ore 03:54:49