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Titolo:
Mechanisms for locating resources in space and time: Impacts on the abundance of insect herbivores
Autore:
Jones, RE;
Indirizzi:
James Cook Univ N Queensland, Sch Trop Biol, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia James Cook Univ N Queensland Townsville Qld Australia 4811 811, Australia
Titolo Testata:
AUSTRAL ECOLOGY
fascicolo: 5, volume: 26, anno: 2001,
pagine: 518 - 524
SICI:
1442-9985(2001)26:5<518:MFLRIS>2.0.ZU;2-1
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
REPRODUCTIVE SEASONALITY; POPULATION-DYNAMICS; CABBAGE BUTTERFLIES; DIVERSITY;
Keywords:
diapause; dispersal; herbivory; host location; movement; resource distribution; seasonality;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Agriculture,Biology & Environmental Sciences
Citazioni:
33
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Jones, RE James Cook Univ N Queensland, Sch Trop Biol, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia James Cook Univ N Queensland Townsville Qld Australia 4811 alia
Citazione:
R.E. Jones, "Mechanisms for locating resources in space and time: Impacts on the abundance of insect herbivores", AUSTRAL EC, 26(5), 2001, pp. 518-524

Abstract

Herbivorous insects have the problem both of locating appropriate host plants and ensuring that the plant-feeding stages of their life cycles are synchronized with the times when those hosts provide a high-quality food resource. Because the taxonomic range of potential hosts is generally narrow, and the temporal window when those hosts are suitable is often relatively short, developmental (especially diapause) and dispersal mechanisms may be critical factors in determining whether or not a species population is successful in a particular plant community. The present paper considers the impactof diapause and dispersal mechanisms on the ability of insect herbivores to cope with two attributes of their host plants: (i) the diversity of the plant community within which the hosts are located; and (ii) the seasonal predictability of host suitability. Some common dispersal mechanisms used by insect herbivores are much more appropriate to low-diversity than to high-diversity plant communities and, similarly, some diapause cues are appropriate only to highly predictable plant phenology. Both agriculture and silviculture characteristically manipulate both these attributes of plant communities, that is, in order to make the human use of plants more efficient, cultivation strategies normally both reduce plant species diversity (often to acondition approaching monoculture) and increase the predictability of plant developmental patterns. Consequently, major pest species in managed systems may not be those that are most common in natural systems, and may be difficult to predict in advance.

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Documento generato il 05/04/20 alle ore 03:58:35