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Titolo:
Attitudes to voluntary counselling and testing for HIV among pregnant women in rural south-west Uganda
Autore:
Pool, R; Nyanzi, S; Whitworth, JAG;
Indirizzi:
MRC, Programme AIDS Uganda, Entebbe, Uganda MRC Entebbe UgandaMRC, Programme AIDS Uganda, Entebbe, Uganda
Titolo Testata:
AIDS CARE-PSYCHOLOGICAL AND SOCIO-MEDICAL ASPECTS OF AIDS/HIV
fascicolo: 5, volume: 13, anno: 2001,
pagine: 605 - 615
SICI:
0954-0121(200110)13:5<605:ATVCAT>2.0.ZU;2-K
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
TO-CHILD TRANSMISSION; RANDOMIZED TRIAL; ORAL ZIDOVUDINE; COTE-DIVOIRE; ACCEPTABILITY; SEROCONVERSION; PREVENTION; COUPLES; REGIMEN; AFRICA;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Citazioni:
23
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Pool, R MRC, Programme AIDS Uganda, POB 49, Entebbe, Uganda MRC POB 49 Entebbe Uganda e AIDS Uganda, POB 49, Entebbe, Uganda
Citazione:
R. Pool et al., "Attitudes to voluntary counselling and testing for HIV among pregnant women in rural south-west Uganda", AIDS CARE, 13(5), 2001, pp. 605-615

Abstract

This paper describes the results of a study exploring the attitudes of women attending maternity clinics to voluntary counselling and testing during pregnancy in rural areas in south-west Uganda. It was a qualitative study using focus group discussions (FGDs). Twenty-four FGDs were carried out with208 women attending maternity clinics in three sites in rural south-west Uganda. The FGDs were all recorded and transcribed, and analysed using standard computer-based qualitative techniques. Almost all women were willing inprinciple to take an HIV test in the event of pregnancy, and to reveal their HIV status to maternity staff. They were anxious, however, about confidentiality, and there was a widespread fear that maternity staff might refuseto assist them when the time came to deliver if their status were known. This applied more to traditional birth attendants than to biomedical health staff. There were also rumours about medical staff intentionally killing HIV-positive patients in order to stern the spread of the epidemic. Women were concerned that if their husbands found out they were HIV-positive they would be blamed and separation or domestic violence might result. In conclusion: although VCT during pregnancy is acceptable in principle, much will need to be done to ensure confidentiality and allay women's fears of stigmatisation and discrimination during delivery. Community sensitisation will be necessary and male partners will have to be involved if interventions are tobe acceptable.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 28/03/20 alle ore 23:39:25