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Titolo:
Type 1 diabetes mellitus, xerostomia, and salivary flow rates
Autore:
Moore, PA; Guggenheimer, J; Etzel, KR; Weyant, RJ; Orchard, T;
Indirizzi:
Univ Pittsburgh, Sch Dent Med, Dept Dent Publ Hlth, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 USA Univ Pittsburgh Pittsburgh PA USA 15261 bl Hlth, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 USA Univ Pittsburgh, Sch Dent Med, Dept Oral Med & Pathol, Pittsburgh, PA USA Univ Pittsburgh Pittsburgh PA USA Oral Med & Pathol, Pittsburgh, PA USA Univ Pittsburgh, Sch Dent Med, Dept Microbiol Biochem, Pittsburgh, PA USA Univ Pittsburgh Pittsburgh PA USA Microbiol Biochem, Pittsburgh, PA USA
Titolo Testata:
ORAL SURGERY ORAL MEDICINE ORAL PATHOLOGY ORAL RADIOLOGY AND ENDODONTICS
fascicolo: 3, volume: 92, anno: 2001,
pagine: 281 - 291
SICI:
1079-2104(200109)92:3<281:T1DMXA>2.0.ZU;2-D
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
PITTSBURGH EPIDEMIOLOGY; AUTONOMIC NEUROPATHY; PERIODONTAL-DISEASE; CANDIDAL LESIONS; DENTAL STATUS; ORAL HEALTH; PREVALENCE; GLAND; IDDM; COMPLICATIONS;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Citazioni:
66
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Moore, PA Univ Pittsburgh, Sch Dent Med, Dept Dent Publ Hlth, 380 Salk Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 USA Univ Pittsburgh 380 Salk Hall Pittsburgh PA USA15261 15261 USA
Citazione:
P.A. Moore et al., "Type 1 diabetes mellitus, xerostomia, and salivary flow rates", ORAL SURG O, 92(3), 2001, pp. 281-291

Abstract

Objective. The Oral Health Science Institute at the University of Pittsburgh has completed a cross-sectional epidemiologic study of 406 subjects withtype I diabetes and 268 control subjects without diabetes that assessed the associations between oral health and diabetes. This report describes the prevalence of dry-mouth symptoms (xerostomia), the prevalence of hyposalivation in this population, and the possible interrelationships between salivary dysfunction and diabetic complications. Study design. The subjects with diabetes were participants in the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications study who were enrolled in an oral health substudy. Control subjects were spouses or best friends of participants or persons recruited from the community through advertisements in local newspapers. Assessments of salivary function included self-reported xerostomia measures and quantification of resting and stimulated whole saliva flow rates. Results. Subjects with diabetes reported symptoms of dry mouth more frequently than did control subjects. Salivary flow rates were also impaired in the subjects with diabetes. Regression models of potential predictor variables were created for the 3 self-reported xerostomia measures and 4 salivary flow rate variables. Of the medical diabetic complications studied (ie, retinopathy, peripheral and autonomic neuropathy, nephropathy, and peripheral vascular disease), only neuropathy was found to be associated with xerostomia and decreased salivary flow measures. A report of dry-mouth symptoms wasassociated with current use of cigarettes, dysgeusia (report of a bad taste), and more frequent snacking behavior. Xerogenic medications and elevatedfasting blood glucose concentrations were significantly associated with decreased salivary flow. Resting salivary flow rates less than 0.01 mL/min were associated with a slightly higher prevalence of dental caries. Subjects who reported higher levels of alcohol consumption were less likely to have lower rates of stimulated salivary flow. Conclusions. Subjects with type I diabetes who had developed neuropathy more often reported symptoms of dry mouth as well as symptoms of decreased salivary flow rates. Because of the importance of saliva in the maintenance and the preservation of oral health, management of oral diseases in diabeticpatients should include a comprehensive evaluation of salivary function.

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Documento generato il 04/12/20 alle ore 20:04:59