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Titolo:
Growth, survivorship, and nutrient uptake of giant clams (Tridacna) in aquaculture effluent
Autore:
Sparsis, M; Lin, J; Hagood, RW;
Indirizzi:
Florida Inst Technol, Dept Biol Sci, Melbourne, FL 32901 USA Florida Inst Technol Melbourne FL USA 32901 Sci, Melbourne, FL 32901 USA Proteus Consulting Inc, Vero Beach, FL USA Proteus Consulting Inc Vero Beach FL USA sulting Inc, Vero Beach, FL USA
Titolo Testata:
JOURNAL OF SHELLFISH RESEARCH
fascicolo: 1, volume: 20, anno: 2001,
pagine: 171 - 176
SICI:
0730-8000(200106)20:1<171:GSANUO>2.0.ZU;2-G
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
DISSOLVED INORGANIC NITROGEN; ZOOXANTHELLAE SYMBIOSIS; SOLOMON-ISLANDS; GIGAS L; DERASA; NUTRITION; CULTURE; PHOTOSYNTHESIS; REQUIREMENTS; RESPIRATION;
Keywords:
aquaculture effluent; giant clams; growth; juvenile; nutrient uptake; survivorship; Tridacna;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Agriculture,Biology & Environmental Sciences
Citazioni:
40
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Lin, J Florida Inst Technol, Dept Biol Sci, Melbourne, FL 32901 USA Florida Inst Technol Melbourne FL USA 32901 elbourne, FL 32901 USA
Citazione:
M. Sparsis et al., "Growth, survivorship, and nutrient uptake of giant clams (Tridacna) in aquaculture effluent", J SHELLFISH, 20(1), 2001, pp. 171-176

Abstract

Experiments were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using juvenile giant clams (Tridacna) to remove dissolved inorganic nutrients (nitrate and phosphate) from aquaculture effluent. Three (T. derasa Roding, T. maxima Roding, and T. squamosa Lamarck) of the four species tested during a two-month experiment all had very high survivorship in both effluent and control seawater, but T. gigas (Linne) experienced 50% mortality. T. maxima and T. squamosa showed virtually no growth in both effluent and control waters. T. gigas had the fastest growth rate among the four species. T. derasa grew significantly faster in effluent than in seawater. In a 24-h experiment (12 h dark followed by 12 h light), all the four species absorbed similar and significant a-mounts of nitrate and phosphate from effluent during the light period. Our study demonstrates that although it may not be possible to rely on giant clams alone to remove all excess dissolved nutrients from intensive food fish aquaculture effluent, it is entirely feasible to use giant clams to remove all excess nutrients in effluent of marine ornamental species. Giant clams can be either incorporated into a polyculture system with othermarine aquarium trade species, or they can be grown in effluent in separate tanks.

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Documento generato il 05/12/20 alle ore 00:09:17