Catalogo Articoli (Spogli Riviste)

OPAC HELP

Titolo:
Differentiation genes: Are they primary targets for human carcinogenesis?
Autore:
Prasad, KN; Hovland, AR; Nahreini, P; Cole, WC; Hovland, P; Kumar, B; Prasad, KC;
Indirizzi:
Univ Colorado, Hlth Sci Ctr, Dept Radiol, Sch Med,Ctr Vitamins & Canc Res,Denver, CO 80262 USA Univ Colorado Denver CO USA 80262 itamins & Canc Res,Denver, CO 80262 USA Univ Calif San Francisco, Sch Med, Dept Pathol, San Francisco, CA 94131 USA Univ Calif San Francisco San Francisco CA USA 94131 ancisco, CA 94131 USA
Titolo Testata:
EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE
fascicolo: 9, volume: 226, anno: 2001,
pagine: 805 - 813
SICI:
1535-3702(200110)226:9<805:DGATPT>2.0.ZU;2-F
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
HUMAN EPITHELIAL-CELLS; TUMOR-SUPPRESSOR GENE; HEMATOPOIETIC PROGENITOR CELLS; T-ANTIGEN GENE; TELOMERASE ACTIVITY; HUMAN FIBROBLASTS; SV40-INDUCED IMMORTALIZATION; MALIGNANT TRANSFORMATION; HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUSES; NEUROBLASTOMA-CELLS;
Keywords:
differentiation genes; tumor suppressor genes; cellular oncogenes; viral oncogenes; telomerase; latent period;
Tipo documento:
Review
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
100
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Prasad, KN Univ Colorado, Hlth Sci Ctr, Dept Radiol, Sch Med,Ctr Vitamins & Canc Res,Campus Box C-278,4200 E 9th Ave, Denver, CO 80262 USA Univ Colorado Campus Box C-278,4200 E 9th Ave Denver CO USA 80262
Citazione:
K.N. Prasad et al., "Differentiation genes: Are they primary targets for human carcinogenesis?", EXP BIOL ME, 226(9), 2001, pp. 805-813

Abstract

In spite of extensive research in molecular carcinogenesis, genes that canbe considered primary targets in human carcinogenesis remain to be identified. Mutated oncogenes or cellular growth regulatory genes, when incorporated into normal human epithelial cells, failed to immortalize or transform these cells. Therefore, they may be secondary events in human carcinogenesis. Based on some experimental studies we have proposed that downregulation of a differentiation gene may be the primary event in human carcinogenesis. Such a gene could be referred to as a tumor-initiating gene. Downregulationof a differentiation gene can be accomplished by a mutation in the differentiation gene, by activation of differentiation suppressor genes, and by inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Downregulation of a differentiation gene can lead to immortalization of normal cells. Mutations in cellular proto-oncogenes, growth regulatory genes, and tumor suppressor genes in immortalized cells can lead to transformation. Such genes could be called tumor-promoting genes. This hypothesis can be documented by experiments published on differentiation of neuroblastoma (NB) cells in culture. The fact that terminal differentiation can be induced in NB cells by adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (CAMP) suggests that the differentiation gene in these cells is not mutated, and thus can be activated by an appropriate agent. The factthat cAMP-resistant cells exist in NB cell populations suggests that a differentiation gene is mutated in these cancer cells, or that differentiationregulatory genes have become unresponsive to cAMP. In addition to cAMP, several other differentiating agents have been identified. Our proposed hypothesis of carcinogenesis can also be applied to other human tumors such as melanoma, pheochromocytoma, medulloblastoma, glioma, sarcoma, and colon cancer.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 29/09/20 alle ore 22:50:59