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Titolo:
Competitive abilities of three indigenous New Zealand plant species in relation to the introduced plant Hieracium pilosella
Autore:
Moen, J; Meurk, CD;
Indirizzi:
Umea Univ, Dept Ecol & Environm Sci, S-90187 Umea, Sweden Umea Univ UmeaSweden S-90187 Ecol & Environm Sci, S-90187 Umea, Sweden Maanaki Whenua Landcare Res NZ, Lincoln, New Zealand Maanaki Whenua Landcare Res NZ Lincoln New Zealand Lincoln, New Zealand
Titolo Testata:
BASIC AND APPLIED ECOLOGY
fascicolo: 3, volume: 2, anno: 2001,
pagine: 243 - 250
SICI:
1439-1791(2001)2:3<243:CAOTIN>2.0.ZU;2-Z
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
TUSSOCK GRASSLAND; SOUTH ISLAND; VEGETATION; NUTRIENTS; DYNAMICS; TRAITS;
Keywords:
competition; competitive effect and response; competitive hierarchies; light; management; New Zealand montane plants; soil fertility;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Agriculture,Biology & Environmental Sciences
Citazioni:
28
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Moen, J Umea Univ, Dept Ecol & Environm Sci, S-90187 Umea, Sweden Umea Univ Umea Sweden S-90187 Environm Sci, S-90187 Umea, Sweden
Citazione:
J. Moen e C.D. Meurk, "Competitive abilities of three indigenous New Zealand plant species in relation to the introduced plant Hieracium pilosella", BASIC AP EC, 2(3), 2001, pp. 243-250

Abstract

The competitive abilities of three montane indigenous New Zealand plant species (Acaena buchananii, Festuca novae-zelandiae, and Raoulia australis) when growing with the locally invasive, introduced Hieracium pilosella were compared in an outdoor pot experiment. Competitive ability was divided intothe competitive effect, or the ability to deplete resources, and the competitive response, or the ability to tolerate low resource levels. The plantswere grown in pots with or without Hieracium, in shade or full sunlight, and with high or low soil fertility. The competitive response rankings showed consistent hierarchies in the different treatments with Festuca being less suppressed than Acaena and Raoulia. Festuca performed especially well in low soil fertility and in shaded treatments, while the other two species were strongly suppressed by Hieracium even in those conditions. However, all three species did relatively better (less badly) in the low fertility and shaded treatments than in the more resource-rich treatments when interactingwith Hieracium. The effect on Hieracium biomass of the indigenous species was generally small and the rankings of competitive effect showed no agreement between the species in the different environmental treatments. We suggest that competitive rankings based on the competitive response component islikely to be a more sensitive measure of competitive ability for these indigenous, slow-growing plants. The results also indicates that these two components of a plant's competitive ability were negatively correlated and thus reflect trade-offs in dealing with competitive situations. Finally, in competition with Hieracium, low-growing indigenous species are likely to perform best when nutrients and light are maintained at low levels.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 30/03/20 alle ore 00:20:17