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Titolo:
Effects of urban land use on pollinator (Hymenoptera : Apoidea) communities in a desert metropolis
Autore:
McIntyre, NE; Hostetler, ME;
Indirizzi:
Texas Tech Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Lubbock, TX 79409 USA Texas Tech Univ Lubbock TX USA 79409 Dept Biol Sci, Lubbock, TX 79409 USA Univ Florida, Dept Wildlife Ecol & Conservat, Gainesville, FL USA Univ Florida Gainesville FL USA fe Ecol & Conservat, Gainesville, FL USA
Titolo Testata:
BASIC AND APPLIED ECOLOGY
fascicolo: 3, volume: 2, anno: 2001,
pagine: 209 - 218
SICI:
1439-1791(2001)2:3<209:EOULUO>2.0.ZU;2-0
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
CANONICAL CORRESPONDENCE-ANALYSIS; GRADIENT ANALYSIS; BEES HYMENOPTERA; PLANT; CONSERVATION;
Keywords:
bee; pollination; Sonoran Desert; xeriscaping; mesiscaping;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Agriculture,Biology & Environmental Sciences
Citazioni:
49
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: McIntyre, NE Texas Tech Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Box 43131, Lubbock, TX 79409 USA Texas Tech Univ Box 43131 Lubbock TX USA 79409 , TX 79409 USA
Citazione:
N.E. McIntyre e M.E. Hostetler, "Effects of urban land use on pollinator (Hymenoptera : Apoidea) communities in a desert metropolis", BASIC AP EC, 2(3), 2001, pp. 209-218

Abstract

We compared the species richness and abundance of pollinator (Hymenoptera:Apoidea) communities in two seasons (September 1998 and April 1999) among four types of urban land use in the Phoenix, Arizona, USA, metropolitan area (xeriscaped residential yards, mesiscaped residential yards, urban desert-remnant parks, and natural desert parks on the fringe of the metropolitan area). Richness and abundance of bees were generally lower in residential areas than in desert areas, with desert areas on the fringe of the metro area possessing the highest diversity of all sites. Residential yards that utilized xeric landscaping had a more diverse bee community (with proportionally more rare species) than did mesic (turf grass) yards, particularly in late summer (September). Although bee community structure was apparently unaffected by the density of local habitat features (native and exotic trees, shrubs, cacti, and herbaceous plants in addition to human-built structures),the types of habitat features do appear to influence the number and types of bees present in an area. These results suggest that urban development can be designed to promote the conservation of bees. Specifically, preservation of desert and greater use of xeric landscaping rather than mesiscaping may help preserve this ecologically and economically vital group of organisms.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 05/04/20 alle ore 17:40:34