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Titolo:
Environmental health education in the medical school curriculum
Autore:
Roberts, JR; Reigart, JR;
Indirizzi:
Med Univ S Carolina, Dept Pediat, Charleston, SC 29425 USA Med Univ S Carolina Charleston SC USA 29425 iat, Charleston, SC 29425 USA
Titolo Testata:
AMBULATORY PEDIATRICS
fascicolo: 2, volume: 1, anno: 2001,
pagine: 108 - 111
SICI:
1530-1567(200103/04)1:2<108:EHEITM>2.0.ZU;2-H
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
BLOOD LEAD CONCENTRATIONS; PORT-PIRIE; EXPOSURE; CHILDREN; FAMILIES; IMPACT; DEATH;
Keywords:
education; environmental health; environmental history; medical education;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Citazioni:
23
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Roberts, JR Med Univ S Carolina, Dept Pediat, 165 Cannon St, Charleston, SC 29425 USA Med Univ S Carolina 165 Cannon St Charleston SC USA 29425 USA
Citazione:
J.R. Roberts e J.R. Reigart, "Environmental health education in the medical school curriculum", AMBU PEDIAT, 1(2), 2001, pp. 108-111

Abstract

Objective.- To collect baseline data of environmental history-taking skills and clinical toxicology knowledge and examine the effects of a lecture onenvironment on students' history-taking skills. Methods.-An anonymous survey was distributed to third-year medical students prior to an asthma lecture that strongly emphasized environmental triggers. Fourteen questions assessed students' practices and attitudes toward environmental history taking. Six multiple-choice questions assessed clinical toxicology knowledge. Histories written by students were reviewed to determine the group's actual performance before and after a lecture on environmental health. Results.-Although students reported that an environmental history was important, few asked about environmental history topics other than smoking and pets. Occupational histories were included for adult patients, but few students asked about parental occupations for pediatric patients. Students recognized the correct antidotal therapy for iron and acetaminophen toxicity but were less proficient at identifying clinical features of lead and organophosphate poisoning. Student history performance, when students were considered as a group, was similar to reported performance, with the presence of pets being the only significant postlecture change in history-taking behavior (P = .01). Conclusions.-Students have a positive attitude toward the need for an environmental history, but in self-reported practice and in actual practice, they explore few major environmental history issues. Data were insufficient to prove that one lecture changed history-taking practices.

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Documento generato il 23/09/20 alle ore 06:39:16