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Titolo:
Dietary variety, energy regulation, and obesity
Autore:
Raynor, HA; Epstein, LH;
Indirizzi:
State University New York Buffalo, Dept Psychol, Buffalo, NY USA State University New York Buffalo Buffalo NY USA sychol, Buffalo, NY USA State University New York Buffalo, Dept Pediat Social & Prevent Med & Psychol, Buffalo, NY USA State University New York Buffalo Buffalo NY USA sychol, Buffalo, NY USA
Titolo Testata:
PSYCHOLOGICAL BULLETIN
fascicolo: 3, volume: 127, anno: 2001,
pagine: 325 - 341
SICI:
0033-2909(200105)127:3<325:DVERAO>2.0.ZU;2-6
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
SENSORY-SPECIFIC SATIETY; LONG-TERM HABITUATION; NUTRITION EXAMINATION SURVEYS; PRIMATE ORBITOFRONTAL CORTEX; ACOUSTIC STARTLE RESPONSE; HUMAN SALIVARY RESPONSE; BROWN ADIPOSE-TISSUE; CAFETERIA DIET; FOOD-INTAKE; INDUCED THERMOGENESIS;
Tipo documento:
Review
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
109
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Epstein, LH State University New York Buffalo, Dept Pediat, Behav Med Dept, Farber Hall, Buffalo, NY 14214 USA State University New York Buffalo Farber Hall Buffalo NY USA 14214
Citazione:
H.A. Raynor e L.H. Epstein, "Dietary variety, energy regulation, and obesity", PSYCHOL B, 127(3), 2001, pp. 325-341

Abstract

Increased variety in the food supply may contribute to the development andmaintenance of obesity. Thirty-nine studies examining dietary variety, energy intake, and body composition are reviewed. Animal and human studies show that food consumption increases when there is more variety in a meal or diet and that greater dietary variety is associated with increased body weight and fat. A hypothesized mechanism for these findings is sensory-specificsatiety, a phenomenon demonstrating greater reductions in hedonic ratings or intake of foods consumed compared with foods not consumed. Nineteen studies documenting change in preference, intake, and hedonic ratings of food after a food has been eaten to satiation in animals and humans are reviewed,and the theory of sensory-specific satiety is examined. The review concludes with the relevance of oral habituation theory as a unifying construct for the effects of variety and sensory-specific satiety, clinical implications of dietary variety and sensory-specific satiety on energy regulation, andsuggestions for future research.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 25/01/20 alle ore 16:08:31