Catalogo Articoli (Spogli Riviste)

OPAC HELP

Titolo:
Anatomical MRI of the developing human brain: What have we learned?
Autore:
Durston, S; Pol, HEH; Casey, BJ; Giedd, JN; Buitelaar, JK; van Engeland, H;
Indirizzi:
Univ Utrecht, Med Ctr, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat, NL-3584 CX Utrecht, Netherlands Univ Utrecht Utrecht Netherlands NL-3584 CX 3584 CX Utrecht, Netherlands NIMH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA NIMH Bethesda MD USA 20892NIMH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA Sackler Inst Dev Psychobiol, New York, NY USA Sackler Inst Dev PsychobiolNew York NY USA Psychobiol, New York, NY USA
Titolo Testata:
JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY
fascicolo: 9, volume: 40, anno: 2001,
pagine: 1012 - 1020
SICI:
0890-8567(200109)40:9<1012:AMOTDH>2.0.ZU;2-5
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER; OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER; MAGNETIC-RESONANCE IMAGES; NORMAL FETAL BRAIN; CORPUS-CALLOSUM; PSYCHIATRIC-DISORDERS; LONGITUDINAL MRI; TEMPORAL-LOBE; AGES 4-18; IN-VIVO;
Keywords:
brain; development; magnetic resonance imaging; review;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Citazioni:
59
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Durston, S Univ Utrecht, Med Ctr, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat, A01-468,Heidelberglaan 100, NL-3584 CX Utrecht, Netherlands Univ Utrecht A01-468,Heidelberglaan 100 Utrecht Netherlands NL-3584 CX
Citazione:
S. Durston et al., "Anatomical MRI of the developing human brain: What have we learned?", J AM A CHIL, 40(9), 2001, pp. 1012-1020

Abstract

Objective: To critically review and integrate the existing literature on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the normally developing brain inchildhood and adolescence and discuss the implications for clinical MRI studies. Method: Changes in regional brain volume with age and differences between the sexes are summarized from reports in refereed journal articles pertaining to MRI of the developing human brain. Results: White matter volumeincreases with age. Gray matter volumes increase during childhood and thendecrease before adulthood. On average, boys have larger brains than girls;after correction for overall brain volume the caudate is relatively largerIn girls, and the amygdala is relatively larger in boys. Differences are of clinical interest given gender-related differences in the age of onset, symptomatology, and prevalence noted for nearly all childhood-onset psychiatric disorders. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is frequently used as an example to demonstrate these points. Conclusions: Understanding the developmental trajectories of normal brain development and differences between the sexes is important for the interpretation of clinical imaging studies.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 25/01/20 alle ore 03:21:56