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Titolo:
Effect of residual hearing prior to cochlear implantation on speech perception in children
Autore:
Gordon, KA; Twitchell, KA; Papsin, BC; Harrison, RV;
Indirizzi:
Hosp Sick Children, Dept Otolaryngol, Toronto, ON M5G 1X8, Canada Hosp Sick Children Toronto ON Canada M5G 1X8 Toronto, ON M5G 1X8, Canada
Titolo Testata:
JOURNAL OF OTOLARYNGOLOGY
fascicolo: 4, volume: 30, anno: 2001,
pagine: 216 - 223
SICI:
0381-6605(200108)30:4<216:EORHPT>2.0.ZU;2-K
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
PRELINGUALLY DEAFENED CHILDREN; SUPERIOR OLIVARY COMPLEX; AUDITORY-SYSTEM; BRAIN-STEM; FOLLOW-UP; AGE; NUCLEUS; PERFORMANCE; DEAFNESS; REORGANIZATION;
Keywords:
auditory development; children; cochlear implants; residual hearing; speech perception;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Citazioni:
46
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Gordon, KA Hosp Sick Children, Cochlear Implant Lab, Rm 6D08,555 Univ Ave,Toronto, ON M5G 1X8, Canada Hosp Sick Children Rm 6D08,555 Univ Ave Toronto ON Canada M5G 1X8
Citazione:
K.A. Gordon et al., "Effect of residual hearing prior to cochlear implantation on speech perception in children", J OTOLARYNG, 30(4), 2001, pp. 216-223

Abstract

We examined the impact of residual hearing prior to cochlear implantation on pre- and postimplantation speech perception outcomes in children. Stimulation of the auditory system prior to implantation because of the presence of residual hearing is important for development of the central auditory pathways, whereas, in the absence of such stimulation, the pathways show lessdevelopment. We hypothesized that children who had some degree of residualhearing preimplantation achieve better speech perception skills than theirpeers with poorer hearing. From the 133 children followed in our program, we identified 37 children who had an audiometric pure-tone average of better than 95 dB HL in the better car at any time preimplantation. Psychophysical speech perception measures, the Word Identification Picture Inventory and the Phonetically Balanced Kindergarten list, in these children were compared with those of 96 implanted children who had poorer hearing prior to implantation. Children with more residual hearing showed higher speech perception scores both before implantation and over their first year of implant use than children with poorer hearing, suggesting that there is an advantage in having a greater degree of residual hearing preimplantation. We suggest that this advantage is promoted, in part, by the greater potential for auditory stimulation provided by high-gain hearing aids in children with greater degrees of residual hearing. This advantage appears to be maintained at least over I year postimplantation, yet the rates of development of postimplantation speech perception are not different between the groups. We suggestthat this may be due to the unique aspects of electrical stimulation from a cochlear implant. Our findings suggest that it is important to minimize the delay of speech perception skills in the preimplantation phase, particularly in children with poor residual hearing. This can be accomplished by implanting children with congenital severe to profound hearing loss at young ages and children with acquired hearing loss soon after the onset. Also, auditory stimulation prior to implantation should be maximized through the consistent use of hearing aids and therapy that emphasizes development of auditory skills.

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Documento generato il 25/09/20 alle ore 22:14:46