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Titolo:
Mirrored-self misidentification: Two cases of focal onset dementia
Autore:
Breen, N; Caine, D; Coltheart, M;
Indirizzi:
Macquarie Univ, Macquarie Ctr Cognit Sci, N Ryde, NSW 2109, Australia Macquarie Univ N Ryde NSW Australia 2109 Sci, N Ryde, NSW 2109, Australia Univ Sydney, Dept Med, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia Univ Sydney Sydney NSWAustralia 2006 pt Med, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
Titolo Testata:
NEUROCASE
fascicolo: 3, volume: 7, anno: 2001,
pagine: 239 - 254
SICI:
1355-4794(2001)7:3<239:MMTCOF>2.0.ZU;2-W
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
RIGHT-HEMISPHERE DAMAGE; MINI-MENTAL STATE; CAPGRAS-SYNDROME; DELUSIONAL MISIDENTIFICATION; ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE; NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS; FALSE RECOGNITION; FACE RECOGNITION; BRAIN INJURY; R NORMS;
Keywords:
delusions of misidentification; mirrored-self misidentification; delusions; face processing; affective face recognition; mirror agnosia;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Citazioni:
96
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Breen, N Macquarie Univ, Dept Psychol, N Ryde, NSW 2109, Australia Macquarie Univ N Ryde NSW Australia 2109 de, NSW 2109, Australia
Citazione:
N. Breen et al., "Mirrored-self misidentification: Two cases of focal onset dementia", NEUROCASE, 7(3), 2001, pp. 239-254

Abstract

We present two patients in whom the mirror sign, the inability to recognize one's own reflected image, was a stable and persisting symptom signallingthe onset of a progressive dementing illness. Extensive neuropsychologicaltesting was conducted with both patients, with particular emphasis on faceprocessing and the understanding of reflected space. Both patients were also investigated with structural imaging techniques (computed tomography andmagnetic resonance imaging). Although the neuroimaging results were not strongly lateralizing for either patient, neuropsychological testing revealedstriking right hemisphere dysfunction with relatively intact left hemisphere cognitive function in both patients. Of particular interest was the patients' dissociation on tests of face processing; one patient, FE, had significant face processing deficits while the other patient, TH, had relatively intact face processing. Further testing with TH revealed striking deficits in his ability to interpret reflected space. The results of the face processing tests are discussed in the context of current models of normal face processing, with particular emphasis on the affective component in face recognition. We propose that a combination of cognitive deficits underlie the mirror sign delusion, including perceptual, affective and reasoning impairments, and also discuss the contributions of cortical and subcortical lesions in these two patients and in delusions in general.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 25/01/20 alle ore 03:14:41