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Titolo:
Searching for food in the wild: a nonhuman primate's expectations about invisible displacement
Autore:
Hauser, MD;
Indirizzi:
Harvard Univ, Dept Psychol, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Harvard Univ Cambridge MA USA 02138 Dept Psychol, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Harvard Univ, Program Neurosci, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Harvard Univ Cambridge MA USA 02138 ram Neurosci, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA
Titolo Testata:
DEVELOPMENTAL SCIENCE
fascicolo: 1, volume: 4, anno: 2001,
pagine: 84 - 93
SICI:
1363-755X(200103)4:1<84:SFFITW>2.0.ZU;2-8
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
OBJECT PERMANENCE; RHESUS MACAQUES; KNOWLEDGE; COGNITION; INFANTS; MONKEYS; COSTS;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Citazioni:
29
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Hauser, MD Harvard Univ, Dept Psychol, 33 Kirkland St,Rm 980 WJH, Cambridge, MA 02138USA Harvard Univ 33 Kirkland St,Rm 980 WJH Cambridge MA USA 02138 A
Citazione:
M.D. Hauser, "Searching for food in the wild: a nonhuman primate's expectations about invisible displacement", DEV SCI, 4(1), 2001, pp. 84-93

Abstract

Five experiments involving invisible displacements were run on a population of semi-free-ranging rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). The goal of these experiments was to assess, without training, the kinds of expectations individuals spontaneously set up when an object has moved out of sight. The first experiment, modeled after studies of human infants and children, involveda table with one box on the top surface and a second box lined tip below, on the ground. An occluder was placed in front of the table, blocking the subject's view. A piece of food was then dropped behind the occluder, above the top box. The presenter then removed the occluder, walked away, and allowed the subject to approach. Consistently, subjects searched in the incorrect bottom box. This error can be interpreted as a failure to understand solidity, containment, or some other factor. It can also be interpreted as an error guided by a gravity bias, i.e. an expectation that all falling objects fall straight down or to the lowest point. Experiments 2-5 tested these alternative hypotheses. Results show, that rhesus monkeys do not have an inherent bottom box bias, are not avoiding the top box, and do recognize that in some contexts boxes can contain or hold food. Thus, for example, it,hen the two boxes are placed on the ground, one in front of the other, and occluded, subjects search in the near box after a piece of food has been rolledbehind the occluder (horizontal trajectory). This shows that rhesus can solve an invisible displacement problem that involves solid containers, it,here one container blocks travel to the other container. We conclude that therhesus monkey's error in Experiment I is guided by an expectation that allfalling objects fall straight down or, at least, to the lowest point. Thisexpectation represents a limitation of their knowledge of physical objectsand events.

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Documento generato il 04/04/20 alle ore 02:52:52