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Titolo:
The culture-negotiation link - Integrative and distributive bargaining through an intercultural communication lens
Autore:
Drake, LE;
Indirizzi:
Univ Maryland, Dept Commun, College Pk, MD 20742 USA Univ Maryland College Pk MD USA 20742 pt Commun, College Pk, MD 20742 USA
Titolo Testata:
HUMAN COMMUNICATION RESEARCH
fascicolo: 3, volume: 27, anno: 2001,
pagine: 217 - 249
SICI:
0360-3989(200107)27:3<217:TCL-IA>2.0.ZU;2-#
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
AMERICAN-BUSINESS NEGOTIATIONS; INDIVIDUALISM-COLLECTIVISM; UNITED-STATES; INFORMATION EXCHANGE; SOCIAL-BEHAVIOR; JAPANESE; CHINESE; SELF; PERSPECTIVES; PREFERENCES;
Tipo documento:
Review
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Citazioni:
123
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Drake, LE Univ Maryland, Dept Commun, 2130 Skinner Bldg, College Pk, MD 20742 USA Univ Maryland 2130 Skinner Bldg College Pk MD USA 20742 0742 USA
Citazione:
L.E. Drake, "The culture-negotiation link - Integrative and distributive bargaining through an intercultural communication lens", HUMAN COMM, 27(3), 2001, pp. 217-249

Abstract

Scholars have only recently begun it to assess the strength with which culture affects negotiator communication, as compared with contextual or structural features of business negotiations. Although prior studies reveal important cross-cultural differences in national negotiating style, they may not help us understand intercultural (mixed-culture) settings. The crucial question is how heavily are international negotiators influenced by their owncultural values? When negotiating with a culturally disparate partner, what are the separate and cumulative effects of culture and contextual variables on negotiator communication? To answer these questions, the effect of culture (here, individualism-collectivism) on integrative (information exchange) and distributive (fixed-sum errors) negotiating is assessed in 32 intercultural dyads. In addition, the contextual effects of role (buyer vs. seller), preconceptions about negotiating (anticipated competition), and mutualadaptation (interdependence in information exchange) are examined. Preliminary results suggest that role requirements influence negotiators more heavily than culture. Supplemental analyses point to some potentially interesting buyer-seller differences and suggest that information exchange is more afunction of reciprocity than of cultural values.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 23/09/20 alle ore 11:08:47