Catalogo Articoli (Spogli Riviste)

OPAC HELP

Titolo:
Cognitive neuroscience of aging: Contributions of functional neuroimaging
Autore:
Cabeza, R;
Indirizzi:
Duke Univ, Ctr Cognit Neurosci, Durham, NC 27708 USA Duke Univ Durham NC USA 27708 , Ctr Cognit Neurosci, Durham, NC 27708 USA
Titolo Testata:
SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY
fascicolo: 3, volume: 42, anno: 2001,
pagine: 277 - 286
SICI:
0036-5564(200107)42:3<277:CNOACO>2.0.ZU;2-6
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
CEREBRAL BLOOD-FLOW; AGE-RELATED-CHANGES; POSITRON-EMISSION-TOMOGRAPHY; WORKING-MEMORY; RECOGNITION MEMORY; OLDER ADULTS; EPISODIC MEMORY; NEURAL ACTIVITY; MOTOR RECOVERY; PET ACTIVATION;
Keywords:
aging; positron emission tomography (PET); functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI); memory; perception; encoding; retrieval;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Citazioni:
54
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Cabeza, R Duke Univ, Ctr Cognit Neurosci, Box 90999, Durham, NC 27708 USA Duke Univ Box 90999 Durham NC USA 27708 99, Durham, NC 27708 USA
Citazione:
R. Cabeza, "Cognitive neuroscience of aging: Contributions of functional neuroimaging", SC J PSYCHO, 42(3), 2001, pp. 277-286

Abstract

By revealing how brain activity during cognitive performance changes as a function of aging, studies using positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are contributing to the development of a new discipline of Cognitive Neuroscience of Aging. This article reviews functional neuroimaging studies of cognitive aging in the domains of visual perception, episodic memory encoding and semantic memory retrieval, episodic memory retrieval, implicit memory, and working memory. The most consistent finding of these studies was that brain activity tends to be less lateralized in older adults than in younger adults. This finding is conceptualized in terms of a model called Hemispheric Asymmetry Reduction in Old Adults (HAROLD). According to a compensation hypothesis, bihemispheric involvement could help counteract age-related neurocognitive decline, whereas, according to a dedifferentiation hypothesis, it reflects a difficulty in recruiting specialized neural mechanisms.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 25/01/20 alle ore 15:59:00