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Titolo:
Bioaccessibility of mercury in soils
Autore:
Barnett, MO; Turner, RR;
Indirizzi:
Auburn Univ, Dept Civil Engn, Auburn, AL 36849 USA Auburn Univ Auburn AL USA 36849 iv, Dept Civil Engn, Auburn, AL 36849 USA
Titolo Testata:
SOIL & SEDIMENT CONTAMINATION
fascicolo: 3, volume: 10, anno: 2001,
pagine: 301 - 316
SICI:
1532-0383(2001)10:3<301:BOMIS>2.0.ZU;2-G
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
ORAL BIOAVAILABILITY; LEAD;
Keywords:
mercury; bioavailability; contamination; remediation; soil; mercuric sulfide; mercuric chloride; risk assessment;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Agriculture,Biology & Environmental Sciences
Citazioni:
14
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Barnett, MO Auburn Univ, Dept Civil Engn, 208 Harbert Engn Ctr, Auburn, AL36849 USA Auburn Univ 208 Harbert Engn Ctr Auburn AL USA 36849 36849 USA
Citazione:
M.O. Barnett e R.R. Turner, "Bioaccessibility of mercury in soils", SOIL SEDIM, 10(3), 2001, pp. 301-316

Abstract

The initial risk assessment for the East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) floodplain in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, a superfund site heavily contaminated with mercury, was based on a reference dose for mercuric chloride. Mercuric chloride, however, is a soluble mercury compound not expected to be present in the floodplain, which is frequently saturated with water. Previous investigations had suggested mercury in the EFPC floodplain was less soluble and therefore potentially less bioavailable than mercuric chloride, possibly making the results of the risk assessment unduly conservative. A bioaccessibility study, designed to measure the amount of mercury available for absorption ina child's digestive tract (the most critical risk pathway endpoint), was performed on 20 soils from the EFPC floodplain. The average bioaccessible mercury for the 20 soils was 5.3%, compared with 100% of the mercuric chloride subjected to the same conditions. The alteration of the procedure to moreclosely mimic conditions in the digestive tract did not significantly change the results. Therefore, the use of a reference dose for mercuric chloride at EFPC, and potentially at other mercury-contaminated sites, without incorporating a corresponding bioavailability adjustment factor may overestimate the risk posed by the site.

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Documento generato il 05/04/20 alle ore 02:24:55