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Titolo:
Neurobiologic responses to speech in noise in children with learning problems: deficits and strategies for improvement
Autore:
Cunningham, J; Nicol, T; Zecker, SG; Bradlow, A; Kraus, N;
Indirizzi:
Northwestern Univ, Dept Commun Sci, Evanston, IL 60208 USA Northwestern Univ Evanston IL USA 60208 ommun Sci, Evanston, IL 60208 USA Northwestern Univ, Dept Otolaryngol, Evanston, IL 60208 USA Northwestern Univ Evanston IL USA 60208 olaryngol, Evanston, IL 60208 USA Northwestern Univ, Dept Neurobiol & Physiol, Evanston, IL 60208 USA Northwestern Univ Evanston IL USA 60208 & Physiol, Evanston, IL 60208 USA Northwestern Univ, Dept Linguist, Evanston, IL 60208 USA Northwestern Univ Evanston IL USA 60208 Linguist, Evanston, IL 60208 USA
Titolo Testata:
CLINICAL NEUROPHYSIOLOGY
fascicolo: 5, volume: 112, anno: 2001,
pagine: 758 - 767
SICI:
1388-2457(200105)112:5<758:NRTSIN>2.0.ZU;2-2
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
FREQUENCY-FOLLOWING RESPONSES; AUDITORY TEMPORAL PERCEPTION; ADULT OWL MONKEYS; IMPAIRED CHILDREN; HUMAN BRAIN; CONVERSATIONAL SPEECH; STOCHASTIC RESONANCE; CROSS-CORRELATION; BACKGROUND-NOISE; DISCRIMINATION;
Keywords:
children; learning and attention disorders; central auditory physiology; noise; speech-sound perception; acoustic cue enhancement;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
69
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Cunningham, J Northwestern Univ, Dept Commun Sci, 2299 N Campus Dr, Evanston, IL 60208 USA Northwestern Univ 2299 N Campus Dr Evanston IL USA 60208 USA
Citazione:
J. Cunningham et al., "Neurobiologic responses to speech in noise in children with learning problems: deficits and strategies for improvement", CLIN NEU, 112(5), 2001, pp. 758-767

Abstract

Objectives: Some children with learning problems (LP) experience speech-sound perception deficits that worsen in background noise. The first goal wasto determine whether these impairments are associated with abnormal neurophysiologic representation of speech features in noise reflected at brain-stem and cortical levels. The second goal was to examine the perceptual and neurophysiological benefits provided to an impaired system by acoustic cue enhancements. Methods: Behavioral speech perception measures (just noticeable differencescores), auditory brain-stem responses, frequency-following responses and cortical-evoked potentials (P1, N1, P1', N1') were studied in a group of LPchildren. Results: We report abnormalities in the fundamental sensory representationof sound at brain-stem and cortical levels in the LP children when speech sounds were presented in noise, but not in quiet. Specifically, the neurophysiologic responses from these LP children displayed a different spectral pattern and lacked precision in the neural representation of key stimulus features. Cue enhancement benefited both behavioral and neurophysiological responses. Conclusions: Overall, these findings contribute to our understanding of the preconscious biological processes underlying perception deficits and may assist in the design of effective intervention strategies. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

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Documento generato il 29/03/20 alle ore 12:19:26