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Titolo:
Evidence that age-associated memory impairment is not a normal variant of aging
Autore:
Goldman, WP; Morris, JC;
Indirizzi:
Washington Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, St Louis, MO 63108 USA Washington Univ St Louis MO USA 63108 Dept Neurol, St Louis, MO 63108 USA Washington Univ, Dept Pathol, St Louis, MO 63130 USA Washington Univ St Louis MO USA 63130 Dept Pathol, St Louis, MO 63130 USA Washington Univ, Alzheimers Dis Res Ctr, St Louis, MO USA Washington UnivSt Louis MO USA Alzheimers Dis Res Ctr, St Louis, MO USA
Titolo Testata:
ALZHEIMER DISEASE & ASSOCIATED DISORDERS
fascicolo: 2, volume: 15, anno: 2001,
pagine: 72 - 79
SICI:
0893-0341(200104/06)15:2<72:ETAMII>2.0.ZU;2-M
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
MILD COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT; MINI-MENTAL STATE; ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE CERAD; SENILE DEMENTIA; POPULATION; PREDICTORS; RELIABILITY; CONSORTIUM; DIAGNOSIS; ESTABLISH;
Keywords:
age-associated memory impairment; dementia; aging;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
42
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Morris, JC Washington Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, 4488 Forest Pk Ave,Suite130, St Louis, MO 63108 USA Washington Univ 4488 Forest Pk Ave,Suite 130 St Louis MO USA 63108
Citazione:
W.P. Goldman e J.C. Morris, "Evidence that age-associated memory impairment is not a normal variant of aging", ALZ DIS A D, 15(2), 2001, pp. 72-79

Abstract

The concept of age-associated memory impairment (AAMI) suggests that clinically recognized memory dysfunction can be a feature of normal aging. To determine whether AAMI represents a variant of normal aging, we longitudinally studied individuals meeting AAMI criteria for development of dementia. Two hundred two community-living individuals (mean age, 77 years) with or without mild memory impairment were assessed annually for an average of 3 years at the Washington University Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. At baseline, no individual was unequivocally demented, as defined by a Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) score of 1 or greater. Modified National Institute of Mental Health criteria were used to identify individuals with AAMI who otherwise met a criterion for cognitive normality. The Short Blessed Test (SBT) was used as a measure of general cognitive function; conservative (SBT = 5)and permissive (SBT = 10) cutoff scores were used as indicators of cognitive normality. With the more permissive measure of cognitive normality, 59 (29%) of the 202 individuals mel AAMI criteria. Progression to dementia by 3years occurred in 42% of AAMI individuals versus 16% of the individuals who did not meet AAMI criteria. With the more restrictive SET cutoff of 5, 22% of individuals met AAMI criteria: progression to dementia occurred in 31%of these individuals versus 9% of the individuals without AAMI. Survival times to dementia differed significantly between AAMI and non-AAMI groups defined by either cutoff score. Our findings indicate that individuals with AAMI have a three-fold greater risk for development of dementia than individuals who do not meet AAMI criteria. Hence, AAMI may represent a dementia prodrome rather than a benign variant of aging.

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Documento generato il 28/03/20 alle ore 23:14:29