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Titolo:
A comparison of health communication models: Risk learning versus stereotype priming
Autore:
Pechmann, C;
Indirizzi:
Univ Calif Irvine, Grad Sch Management, Irvine, CA 92697 USA Univ Calif Irvine Irvine CA USA 92697 ch Management, Irvine, CA 92697 USA
Titolo Testata:
MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY
fascicolo: 2, volume: 3, anno: 2001,
pagine: 189 - 210
SICI:
1521-3269(2001)3:2<189:ACOHCM>2.0.ZU;2-O
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
PROTECTION-MOTIVATION THEORY; PARALLEL PROCESS MODEL; FEAR APPEALS; ATTITUDE-CHANGE; BELIEF MODEL; CONSTRUCT ACCESSIBILITY; TELEVISION; CONSUMPTION; BEHAVIOR; CONSEQUENCES;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Arts & Humanities
Citazioni:
62
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Pechmann, C Univ Calif Irvine, Grad Sch Management, Irvine, CA 92697 USA Univ Calif Irvine Irvine CA USA 92697 t, Irvine, CA 92697 USA
Citazione:
C. Pechmann, "A comparison of health communication models: Risk learning versus stereotype priming", MEDIA PSYCH, 3(2), 2001, pp. 189-210

Abstract

Health communication research and practice have been strongly influenced by the protection motivation theory (Rogers, 1975, 1983), the health belief model (Becker Haefner; Kasl, et al., 1977; Pecker Haefner & Maiman, 1977; Rosenstock, 1974), and similar conceptualizations. I refer to these as risk learning models because the goal is to reach new information about health risks and the behaviors that will minimize those risks. These models have garnered a substantial amount of empirical support and are apparently quite useful to practitioners (Conner di Norman, 1996). The goal of this article is to describe a less familiar but complementary, approach to persuading people to avoid risky behaviors, which I will refer to as the stereotype priming model (Bargh, 1989; Bargh, Chen, & Burrows, 1996; Bargh, Raymond, Pryor,& Strack, 1995). The goal is to make salient preexisting social stereotypes about people who do or do not behave as advocated. The stereotype priming model posits that the stereotypes that we possess regarding the personality traits of groups of people (e.g., smokers, drunk drivers, marijuana users, people with suntans) to a large extent govern our behavior: In this view, it is sometimes useful to capitalize on and reinforce preexisting stereotypes in order to encourage healthy, and/or discourageunhealthy, behaviors. This article reviews the traditional risk learning models and evidence that supports them, provides corresponding information for the stereotype priming model, compares and contrasts the models, and discusses how the stereotype priming model might be used to design health communications campaigns.

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Documento generato il 01/04/20 alle ore 17:45:40