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Titolo:
Friendship quality and sociometric status: between-group differences and links to loneliness in severely abused and nonabused children
Autore:
Howe, TR; Parke, RD;
Indirizzi:
Transylvania Univ, Dept Psychol, Lexington, KY 40508 USA Transylvania Univ Lexington KY USA 40508 Psychol, Lexington, KY 40508 USA Univ Calif Riverside, Dept Psychol, Riverside, CA 92521 USA Univ Calif Riverside Riverside CA USA 92521 chol, Riverside, CA 92521 USA
Titolo Testata:
CHILD ABUSE & NEGLECT
fascicolo: 5, volume: 25, anno: 2001,
pagine: 585 - 606
SICI:
0145-2134(200105)25:5<585:FQASSB>2.0.ZU;2-1
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
SOCIAL INTERACTIONS; MIDDLE CHILDHOOD; PHYSICAL ABUSE; ADJUSTMENT; MALTREATMENT; PERCEPTIONS; ACCEPTANCE; SECURITY; DISTINCT; SYSTEMS;
Keywords:
maltreatment; friendship; sociometrics; loneliness; residential treatment;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Citazioni:
46
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Howe, TR Transylvania Univ, Dept Psychol, Lexington, KY 40508 USA Transylvania Univ Lexington KY USA 40508 Lexington, KY 40508 USA
Citazione:
T.R. Howe e R.D. Parke, "Friendship quality and sociometric status: between-group differences and links to loneliness in severely abused and nonabused children", CHILD ABUSE, 25(5), 2001, pp. 585-606

Abstract

Objective: There were two main aims: first, to illuminate the difference between abused children's general popularity with classmates and success in close friendships; second, to examine the specific interactional qualities of abused children's friendships and their links to loneliness. Method: Thirty-five severely abused children and 43 matched, nonabused children were compared on peer-rated sociometric status, self-reported loneliness, and observed and self-reported friendship quality. Results: Abused children were not rated significantly lower sociometrically, nor did they differ significantly from control children on several measures of friendship quality, such as resolving conflicts and helping each other. However, abused children were observed to be more negative and less proactive in their interactions. They also reported their friendships as beingmore conflictual, and as higher on betrayal and lower on caring. Only observational friendship variables predicted loneliness. Conclusions: The results challenge the assumption that abused children's peer relationships are uniformly more maladaptive than nonabused children's,and point to the possible benefits of structured interventions for "normalizing" their friendship interactions. The pattern of difficulties exhibitedby abused children (e.g., conflict) provides foci for more specific interventions. Multi-method assessments are necessary and the multi-dimensional nature of children's social adjustment is important to understand. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

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Documento generato il 24/09/20 alle ore 07:57:20